Descriptions of Maryland

Bernard C. Steiner
(1867-1926)

First electronic edition 1999, 284 Kb

Text scanned and encoded by
William C. Chase and Victoria J. Oneda

Source:
Johns Hopkins University Studies
in Historical and Political Science
Series XXII, Nos. 11-12
Baltimore
The Johns Hopkins Press
November-December, 1904

Editorial Declaration: Typography and running titles have not been preserved. Words and abbreviations in italics have been rendered as such without interpretation. “Soft” hyphens occurring at line breaks have been removed. “Soft” hyphens occurring at page breaks have been removed and the trailing part of the word placed on the preceding page. Titles appearing in the Johns Hopkins University Studies in Historical and Political Science were paginated both as free-standing monographs and as serial entries; pages 1 to 87 of Steiner’s monograph correspond to pages 565 to 651, Series XXII, Johns Hopkins University Studies in Historical and Political Science (1904). Appendix entries have been culled from the index for all 1904 titles; references are to note numbers rather than to page numbers as in the copy text.


 

Series XXII     Nos. 11-12

Johns Hopkins University Studies
in
Historical and Political Science

(Edited by H. B. Adams, 1882-1901)

J. H. Hollander   J. M. Vincent   W. W. Willoughby
Editors

DESCRIPTIONS OF MARYLAND

BY

BERNARD C. STEINER

Baltimore
The Johns Hopkins Press
Published Monthly
November-December, 1904

 


THE FRIEDENWALD CO., PRINTERS,
BALTIMORE, MD., U. S. A.


 

DESCRIPTIONS OF MARYLAND.

From the time when Lucas Vasquez de Ayllon sailed to America and entered the Chesapeake Bay, many travellers have entered the territory now embraced in the State of Maryland and have written accounts of what they found there. Other descriptions of the State or of parts of it have been written to serve as guide-books to strangers. Still other descriptions, more or less imaginary in character, are found in the pages of works of fiction. It seemed a task worthy of performance to gather together the references to the State found in works in the classes above named and to prepare a chronological bibliography of the descriptions of Maryland. No claim for completeness is made for the list of books; but, at the least, it forms a good working basis for the student. To several classes of investigators the list should prove of use: the man interested in the State’s history, the chronicler of local conditions, the student of the manners and customs of the people at any given epoch, and the biographer who may find references to the man whose life he is studying. Most of the books included in the list are contained in the valuable collections of the Enoch Pratt Free Library, and the preparation of the monograph has been possible only because of the cordial co-operation and painstaking care of Miss Anna M. Doerksen, Superintendent of Circulation in that institution.

It is probable that Ayllon’s voyage (1) was followed by others made by Spaniards in the latter part of the sixteenth century (2), but the first great explorer of Maryland was Capt. John Smith (3), who sailed up the Chesapeake from Jamestown in 1608, drawing a wonderfully accurate map of the Bay and partially exploring the Patapsco, Bush, Susquehanna, North East, Elk, and Sassafras Rivers. After his, the next important narrative is that of the first Maryland expedition, sent out by Lord Baltimore in the Ark and the Dove and landing in the Province on March 25, 1634. This narrative by the good Jesuit, Father Andrew White, has 6 come down to us in three forms, all of which have been printed (4). In the Calvert Papers (5), and in the Provincial Archives of Maryland (6), are found scattered here and there many references to geographical conditions, and the civil war between the Proprietary Party at St. Mary’s and the Puritans at Providence in Anne Arundel county (1654), caused the publication of a number of tracts (7), describing the events of that time.

Shortly after this (1659), we have the journal of the Dutch Embassy to Maryland, written by Augustine Herman (8), whose journey led to his removing to the Province and engraving the second important early map of the State. Ten years later, he was followed by George Alsop and Nathaniel Shrigley (9), who enumerated the rivers and bays of the Province and recount among its products, “Fuller’s Earth, Marl, Saltpeter, Iron, Stone, Lead, Tin, and Silver Oar.” Several (9a) novels describe Maryland in the seventeenth century.

The Labadists, Dankers and Sluyter (10), visited Bohemia Manor, the home of Augustine Herman, in 1679, and give interesting glimpses of the early settlers in Cecil County. They suggest for the first time a Chesapeake and Delaware Canal, and note that they find their way by blazed trees in the absence of roads.

The early Quaker preachers were great travellers and were very apt to print the narrative of their adventures. George Fox (10a), and Wenlock Christison, visited the shores of the Chesapeake and made converts there and, from 1698 to 1738, Thomas Chalkley (11), frequently visited the Province: in 1698, he visited Friends on the Patuxent and, crossing from the Clifts, spent some time on the Choptank; in 1701, he visited Patuxent River and Herring Bay; in 1703, he went through Maryland, Virginia and Delaware; in 1706, he visited Cecil and Baltimore Counties and established relations with Aquila Paca, high sheriff of the latter county; in 1713, he went up the Chesapeake; in 1715, he attended yearly meeting at Choptank; in 1717, he was at Nottingham and Bush River; in 1720, he visited Friends on West River; in 1721, he was again at Bush River and Nottingham; in 1725, he revisited Nottingham and the Eastern Shore; in 1732, he was at Nottingham and the vicinity; and, finally, in 1738, he visited the Eastern Shore and, crossing the Chesapeake in a boat, went from house to house among the Friends on West, Patuxent, Piscataway, and Potomac Rivers and then 7 turned northward to the Patapsco, the Forest of Gunpowder River, Deer Creek, and West Nottingham.

During this period, Hugh Jones (12) wrote on the linen manufacture in Somerset County in 1697. The Rev. Thomas Bray (13) came to the Province for a few months in 1700, and has left us a few notes of his experiences, and the ex-Quaker, Rev. George Keith (14), travelled, in 1703 and 1704, up the Chesapeake to West River and was at Annapolis and Herring Creek with Esquire Finch, Sir Thomas Lawrence, Rev. Mr. Hall, and Rev. Mr. Colbatch. Crossing to Kent Island, he visited the churches in Talbot County, went northward to Shrewsbury, crossed the Sassafras, visited Bohemia Manor, returned to Kent Island and Annapolis, and finally sailed down the Chesapeake. Stanley’s novel deals (14a) with St. Mary’s County during this period. About 1705, Ebenezer Cook, “Poet Laureat” as he styles himself, wrote in verse the witty and sarcastic “Sotweed Factor” (15), describing a trip along the Piscataway River, on the Eastern Shore and to Annapolis. His account of the Quaker is particularly good. It may be well to state that the interpretation of his title is “Tobacco Commission Agent.” A little over twenty years later, Cook (16) writes of a second visit to Annapolis, during a meeting of the General Assembly to discuss the tobacco problem.

About this time, Bamfylde-Moore Carew (16a) came to Talbot County as an indentured servant. He was favorably impressed with the country and must have seen a good deal of the Eastern Shore, as he was at Newtown (now Pocomoke City). Soon after his arrival in the Province, he ran away and tells an interesting story of his wanderings among the Indians and of the early relations of the colonists with them.

The only other traveller of the early eighteenth century whom I have found is Benjamin Holme (17), another Quaker, who visited the yearly meetings in 1717 and 1718, travelling to the West, Bush, and Choptank Rivers and meeting Aquila Paca. Twenty years later, the noted evangelist, George Whitefield, passed through the Province preaching as he went (17a).

George Washington’s journal (18), in 1747 and 1754, contains references to his journeys to the West, stopping at Fort Cumberland and Col. Cresap’s, and Peter Kalm (19), the naturalist, visited the Province in 1748. The Western Maryland German settlements were visited about this time 8 by Schlatter, Muhlenberg and other pious missionaries, such as Schnell (19a). Some interesting notes on the Atlantic Slope and on the rivers, are found in Lewis Evans’ Essays (20) published in 1755, and about thirty pages are devoted to the Province in Douglass’ “North America” (21), written about 1752. Potter’s novel (21a), “House of de Mailly” brings in the life of old Annapolis about 1744. Christopher Gist’s journals (22) describe journeys in Allegany County in 1750, 1753 and 1754. Governor Sharpe’s Correspondence (23) is most valuable for the period of his administration, 1753-69, and we get glimpses of the life of the Province in 1755 from a news letter written by Daniel Dulany (24), describing military, political and social affairs. Of especial interest are his references to the Acadians in Maryland and to a disreputable clergyman, of whose career in the Province he gives a long account. In 1760, Andrew Burnaby (25) made quite an extended trip through the Province, going from Mt. Vernon to Annapolis via Clifton Ferry, Marlboro, Queen Anne, the Patuxent and South Rivers, and thence across the Chesapeake to the Sassafras. We note also Major Robert Rogers’ concise account of North America in 1765 (25a). The old travellers are much more useful in telling of the smaller towns and the country than the modern ones are. The former went, on horse back or by coach, slowly; the latter come by railroad into the State, stop at Baltimore and make no other stops. We may further note that the travellers describe two routes for the most part, that from the north to the south and that from the east to the west. The north and south route, in the eighteenth century, went on the Eastern Shore to the Sassafras River or to Rock Hall in Kent County, thence boat was taken for Annapolis, from which place the route lay overland to Alexandria. Later Baltimore rose into importance and boat was frequently taken from Frenchtown on the Elk River to Baltimore, whence the trip to Washington was made overland. When the railroad was built, the route became an all land one, save for the ferry across the Susquehanna, which stream was not bridged for a number of years. As a result of this route, we find very few descriptions of the lower Eastern Shore, or of St. Mary’s or Calvert Counties and very few descriptions of any part of the Eastern Shore after the railway route was completed.

The east and west route ran, in the latter eighteenth century, from Baltimore to Frederick, Hagerstown and Cumberland, 9 along the Patapsco and over the mountains. By this route, came Braddock on his ill-fated expedition in 1755, and the road was carried over the Alleghanies later and macadamized by the Federal government, becoming known as the Cumberland or National road. (25b).

When the railroad was built, about the same line of progress westward was followed for a while, but when the city of Washington grew and the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad was completed to the Ohio River, the traveller was diverted to the South, Frederick and Hagerstown were side tracked, and he went from Baltimore to Washington and then to Cumberland via Harper’s Ferry.

The founding of Baltimore in 1729 and the beginning of the German immigration to that port and to Western Maryland about that time are the most significant facts in the Provincial history during the eighteenth century, and there was a far-reaching influence of these German immigrants, headed by such leaders as Rev. Philip W. Otterbein (26), pastor of Reformed churches in Frederick from 1760 to 1765, and in Baltimore from 1774 to 1813.

For the administration of the last Provincial Governor, Capt. Robert Eden, we have the valuable aid of William Eddis’ letters (27). In addition to describing the political affairs from 1769 to 1777, and the social life at Annapolis, Eddis tells of trips made by him to Kent Island, to Rousby Hall on the Patuxent, to Baltimore, to Frederick and to Hagerstown.

In 1772 began the ceaseless journeying of Francis Asbury, the pioneer Methodist bishop, whose travels ended with his life in 1816. His journal (28) is chiefly devoted to church affairs, though we get occasional glimpses of the conditions which prevailed on the Eastern Shore during the Revolution and of the families of the Ridgelys of Hampton and the Goughs at Perry Hall. Another famous early Methodist itinerant, Freeborn Garrettson (29), began his peripatetic course through the State in 1774 and ended it in 1818. Like Asbury’s, his record is mainly a part of the life of the Methodist Church. Asbury and Garrettson were passive Tories. A very active one, J. F. D. Smyth, has left us a vivid narrative in his “Tour in the United States” (30). In 1774, he was engaged in farming and tobacco raising in Southern Maryland and tells of the Potomac and Piscataway Rivers, of Port Tobacco, St. Mary’s City, and Annapolis, of the Jesuits, and of Chesapeake Bay. After the outbreak 10 of the Revolutionary war, he went from Piscataway to Baltimore by way of Benedict, Upper Marlboro, Annapolis, and Elkridge, returning on foot via Nottingham and Allen’s Fresh. Later, he became involved in Connolly’s Tory plot and went to Frederick, Middletown, and Hagerstown. Captured and imprisoned in Frederick by the Committee of Observation, he escaped to Cumberland; but was retaken, brought back to Frederick, and thence carried to Baltimore, going from the Head of the Elk in a privateer. Making a second escape, he came down Chesapeake Bay to the Nanticoke River and crossed the Peninsula, via Princess Anne to Cape Henlopen, catching interesting glimpses of the Loyalist uprising. The Revolutionary series (30a) of Maryland Archives contains many interesting contemporary descriptions. In 1778, Thomas Anburey (31) gives a pleasing picture of the Christmas hospitality he found in Frederick, and, in 1782, Popp (32) visited the same part of the State.

We get glimpses of the Hessian soldiers (33) with General Howe, in 1777-78, and as prisoners in Frederick in 1781. Madrillon (33a) published a work in French in 1782, which is really an American guide-book. A number of biographical sketches of the Maryland signers of the Declaration of Independence give valuable information as to the contemporary conditions. Following these titles we have placed the titles of other biographical works dealing with noted Marylanders (33b).

Washington (34) visited the State in the Cornwallis campaign of 1781, to surrender his commission at Annapolis in 1783, to attend to business of the Potomac Company at Annapolis in 1784, at Frederick in 1785, and at Warburton in 1788, and to be inaugurated President in 1789. In 1791, he went to Chestertown and Annapolis, on his return to Mt. Vernon, visiting Governor Howard and St. John’s College at the State capital. In the same year, he went to Frederick and Taneytown, and in 1794, journeyed as far West as Williamsport and Cumberland. He visited Baltimore in 1795, 1796, and 1798, and, in the last year, stopped at Bladensburg and at Elkton on his way northward.

In 1784, Dr. Thomas Coke (35) began his Methodist itinerancies in the State, coming first to Quantico and Annamessex in Somerset County, and passing through Snow Hill, Cambridge, Tuckahoe, Kent Island, Worton, and Gunpowder he arrived at Baltimore in time for the famous Christmas conference. Thence he went to Abingdon, Tuckahoe, 11 and Pocomoke City (then called Newtown), back via Abingdon to Baltimore and closed his journey by short trips to Baltimore and Annapolis, and to Abingdon where Dr. Jacob Hall was conducting Cokesbury College, the first Methodist institution of higher education in the world. In 1787, he was again at Abingdon and the Baltimore conference with Asbury, and, in the succeeding year, he also visited Annapolis and Chestertown. He visited Bladensburg, Baltimore, and Elkton in 1791, and went from Elkton to Baltimore for conference again in 1792. John D. Schoepf (36), a German scholar, in 1787, made geological observations in his “Beiträge zur mineralogischen Kenntniss des ostlichen Theils von Nord Amerika und seinen Gebirge.” A year later, came J. P. Brissot de Warville (37) to the Head of Elk, going thence via Havre de Grace to Baltimore, whose bad sanitary condition he noted. He complained of the bad roads, as did all of his contemporaries, and remarked on the political conditions and the result of slavery. F. M. Bayard (38), another Frenchman residing in Baltimore, which city he describes, made a very interesting summer journey to Berkeley Springs, in 1791, passing through Ellicott’s Mills (or as he calls them Hellicott’s), Frederick and Hagerstown. In the same year F. A. R. Chateaubriand (39) saw Baltimore, and describes the approach to it and a plantation he visited on the Chesapeake.

Thos. Cooper’s “Information respecting America” (40) describes Baltimore and Hagerstown (he calls it Haggar’s Town), and mentions the price of articles there in 1793. Two other descriptions date from the same year: W. Priest (41) came up the Chesapeake to Annapolis, whose society and negroes he describes and then went to Philadelphia, via Baltimore, returning by packet from Frenchtown to Fell’s Point and finding yellow fever in Baltimore; J. Harriott went (42) from Elkton to Georgetown, via Havre de Grace, Baltimore, and Bladensburg and returned from Baltimore to Frenchtown by a packet boat. He made observations on farming methods and trading, on coaching, and on the high prices, and was cheated by his landlady. Thomas Twining (43) gives a very interesting account of a journey from Elkton to Washington and return in 1795. He stopped several days in Baltimore, at the Indian queen tavern, saw Canton and Governor Howard’s House, Belvidere, on the outskirts, met the Gilmors and attended a dinner of the St. George’s Society. He complains bitterly of the bad roads.

12 Isaac Weld, Jr. (44), came from Elkton to Baltimore, via Charlestown and Principio Furnace, in 1796, crossing the Susquehanna in winter, and noting the iron works. He then speaks of the Presbyterian church, the harbor, the banks, the theatres, and the hospitality of Baltimore, and tells of his journey to Washington and back to Philadelphia. He sees exhausted land, wretched roads and log cabins, is interested in slavery and in the climate, and notes the oyster industry and the inquisitive disposition of the people. Shortly afterwards he comes from Pennsylvania to Woodsboro and Frederick, and goes thence to Hoe’s Ferry via Rockville, the Great Falls of the Potomac, Georgetown, and Port Tobacco, and returns to Frederick, whence he travels to Baltimore.

In 1796, Dr. Coke (45) came again to America and landed on St. Mary’s River. After a short stay in Southern Maryland, he came to Annapolis and Baltimore, where he attended the conference at the time of the burning of the Lovely Lane Academy and Meeting House. The Duke de la Rochefoucault-Liancourt (46) came to Maryland in 1796, moving from Harper’s Ferry to Frederick, Ellicott’s Mills, Washington, Annapolis, and Baltimore. He next journeyed to Philadelphia, via Havre de Grace, and returned to the State, entering it on the Eastern Shore at Warwick, and going on to Chestertown, Church Hill, Centreville, and Kent Island. Here he crossed to Annapolis, and went to Upper Marlboro, Bladensburg, Elkridge Landing, Baltimore, Havre de Grace, and Principio. He visited Doughoregan Manor, saw iron works and a glass factory, noted the social conditions as to education, slavery, religion, and justice, observed convicts and farmers, complained of the roads, and inspected Washington and St. John’s Colleges. He took a gloomy view of Maryland and of its farming.

John Bernard (47) visited Annapolis, Baltimore and Hagerstown in 1798, and discussed negroes, politics, elections, and theatres of Baltimore, in his published “Retrospections.” Robert Parkinson (48) tried farming near Baltimore at Orange Hill (now Orangeville), from 1798 to 1801, and made a tour from Georgetown to Philadelphia through Baltimore, and to Annapolis and the Eastern Shore, in those years. His observations upon farming topics such as the Hessian fly are of interest, as is his account of Captain O’Donnell. About the same time, John Davis (49) came from Frenchtown to Poole’s Island, Baltimore, Elkridge, 13 Bladensburg, and Washington, travelling by coach from Baltimore. In 1805, we find another Quaker preacher, D. Ripley (50) visiting Baltimore and Annapolis for evangelistic purposes. R. Sutcliff (51) passed through the State several times in that and the next year. He first went from Elkton and Havre de Grace to Baltimore, which town he found excited over the Bonaparte-Patterson marriage, and then to Alexandria. Thence he returned to Port Tobacco, via Piscataway, commenting on the negro slaves, and went on to Baltimore and Havre de Grace. Later he went from Frenchtown to Baltimore and passed through Ellicott’s Mills, Georgetown, and Frederick. A third trip took him from Charlestown to Bush River, to the Quaker meeting at Baltimore and to Washington, via Elkridge and Bladensburg. On his return, he went northward from Baltimore to the Gunpowder Falls. From this period date the activities of Benjamin Banneker (51a), the negro mathematician, and Miss Susanna Mason (51b), both of whom are associated with Ellicott’s Mills. The latter also wrote on Deer Creek.

John Melish (52) came in 1806 and 1807 twice through the State, taking the route from the Head of Elk to Baltimore by boat one time, and that from Frenchtown the other time. He remarked on the coffee house and the library in Baltimore. In 1807, Joseph Scott (52) issued his geographical description of the States of Maryland and Delaware, a useful book.

Thomas R. Joynes (53), our next traveller, came from Upper Marlboro to Annapolis, via Queen Anne, in 1810. Crossing the Chesapeake to Easton, he went south to Vienna, Quantico, Princess Anne, and Pocomoke City, where, I regret to add, he had fever and ague. Lowell Mason (54), the musical composer, crossed the State by the Havre de Grace route in 1812. In 1813 and 1814, occurred the campaigns of the second British war which touched Maryland soil. Sir Harry Smith’s “Memoirs” (55), and G. R. Gleig (56), the Subaltern, give interesting sketches of the Bladensburg and North Point campaigns, and Williams (57) gives the most exhaustive account of the former from the American point of view.

J. H. W. Hawkins’ (57a) life describes several journeys to Western Maryland and Baltimore between 1818 and 1844. He was Baltimore born and tells of the North Point Battle and of the beginnings of the Washingtonian temperance movement. After the war of 1812 F. Hall (58) visited Annapolis 14 and Baltimore in 1816, describing the social life and the newly erected Washington monument, whence Baltimore took its well-known sobriquet. In 1817, M. Birkbeck (59) crossed the State from Washington to Frederick and Hagerstown and noticed the horses with special interest. In the same year, John Palmer (60) crossed the State by the Frenchtown route, and returned from Washington to Mercersburg, Pa. via Frederick and Hagerstown. Later he again crossed Western Maryland journeying from Harper’s Ferry to Hanover, Pa., via Frederick, Woodsboro, and Taneytown (he calls it Thorneytown). He makes observations on trade and farming, on locusts, and on slavery. J. M. Duncan (61) visited Baltimore and the battlefield of North Point in 1818. He is one of a number of travellers of this period, to describe the churches of the city, being especially impressed by the Roman Catholic Cathedral and the Unitarian Church. He visited Fort McHenry, the penitentiary, and hospital, noted the schools and flour mills, and the two monuments, for the Battle monument was erected about this time. He tells of some recent mail robberies. E. Howitt (62) visited Baltimore in 1819, and was impressed with its iron manufactures and mercantile growth. In 1819 and 1820, W. Faux (63) came through the State by the Frenchtown route, made some acute observations on agriculture, passed through Frederick, Hagerstown, and Cumberland, on his westward course and returned by the same route to Washington. In the same year, A. Hodgson (64) sailed on the Chesapeake Bay and visited Doughoregan Manor. Jared Sparks (65) was pastor of the Unitarian Church in Baltimore from 1819 to 1820 and came back to Maryland in 1825, and in 1826, on his search for manuscripts. He stopped at Barnum’s Hotel in Baltimore, went to Savage factory, and visited Chancellor Bland at Annapolis. F. W. Darusmont (66) in 1820, visited Baltimore and was impressed by its hilliness and its monuments. She speaks of the prevalence of yellow fever. In 1823, J. C. Beltrami (67) also noticed the monuments in passing through Baltimore, whence he went to Washington and Frederick. A year later the notorious Mrs. Anne Royall (68) went from Washington to Baltimore by the Frenchtown route. In addition to those sights which other travellers noted, she speaks of Jones’s Falls, the Masonic Hall, Fell’s Point, the Insane Asylum, St. Mary’s Seminary, and the markets. J. Fenimore Cooper (69) commented on the society of Baltimore, while stopping 15 on his way to Washington, in the same year, and Gottfried Duden (70) noted the open sewers, the table customs, the horse markets, and the hotels. He visited Peale’s Museum and going westward spoke of the farms and fences he saw, while passing through Ellicott’s Mills, New Market, Frederick, Hagerstown, Hancock, and Cumberland, and of the Alleghany Mountains he crossed on his way to Wheeling. About this time, Lafayette came to Baltimore (71) from Frenchtown, being met at the boundary of the State by Col. Bentalou and John Quincy Adams. His secretary, Levasseur, describes the night on the steamer, the reception at Fort McHenry on the arrival at Baltimore, and the festivities that followed. The party then went to Washington, returned to attend the Farmers’ “Fete” at Baltimore, went to Annapolis, Frederick, and the Monocacy and later came from Havre de Grace to Baltimore by boat. Comment is made on the city’s fire department. The diary of John Quincy Adams (72) refers to a number of visits to the State, giving accounts of Lafayette’s reception in 1824, and speaking of the celebration of the battle of North Point, and the funeral of Colonel John Eager Howard which he attended in 1827. In 1828, he stopped at Barnum’s Hotel, attended the Circuit Court, and speaks of J. V. L. McMahon; in 1837, he was in the city again at the same hotel, famous for so many years; and, in 1840, he made another stop in Baltimore, and wrote of Dr. Duncan and Robert Gilmor.

Bernhard, the Duke of Saxe Weimar (73) came from Frenchtown to Baltimore in 1825, saw the usual sights of monuments, museum and churches, visited the Almshouse and the Medical College and then travelled westward to Frederick. Captain Basil Hall (74) was in Baltimore in 1827, and talks of the aged Charles Carrollton, of the trade and society of the place. About the same time Mrs. Royall (75) came into the State again and travelled to Frederick, Hagerstown, Baltimore, and Annapolis. She made many sarcastic remarks about the reading of the people, the dress of the women, and the roads, and mentions Bishop Kemp, Rev. Dr. Breckenridge, J. H. B. Latrobe, Mrs. Caton, and other celebrities. She boarded with Mrs. Kimball in Frederick and tells of Fort Severn, St. John’s College and the State house at Annapolis.

James Stuart (76), in the winter of 1829 and 1830, crossed the Susquehanna on his way from Elkton to Baltimore, wrote of canvas-back ducks, and saw the beginning 16 of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. He also went to Annapolis and Washington. James Boardman (77) came to Baltimore through the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal in the year 1830, and noted the churches and monuments, the shot tower, and the new Exchange building, which later became the custom house. Irish laborers, the circus, the negroes, Barnum’s funeral and the aged Carroll, are spoken of by him. In the same year, S. A. Ferrall (78) wrote of the schooners and steamers in the Bay, the trees found along the Baltimore streets, the use of titles, and the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. Mrs. Frances Trollope (79) also came in 1830, driving across the mountains to Hagerstown and Baltimore. She speaks of the fruits, flowers, snakes, and insects, the Chesapeake and Ohio and the Chesapeake and Delaware Canals, the Elk and the Patapsco Rivers. The marble houses and fountains of Baltimore, the schools and theatres, the lack of gaiety in the place, and the excellence of Barnum’s Hotel all receive mention. Several tales and novels (79a) treat of the early years of the nineteenth century.

After 1830 came a period of frequent travellers. T: Hamilton (79b) came to Baltimore in the winter of 1830-1831, saw the society and trade of the place, remarked on slavery, wrote of the aged Carroll, and then went on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad drawn by horses towards Frederick and thence by coach to Hagerstown and Clear Springs, on his way to Washington, Pa. In 1831, Sir J. C. Alexander (80) saw the Baltimore and Ohio trains drawn by horses, and wrote of the scenery about Baltimore, of Carroll, and the monuments.

Thomas Hamilton visited the State in 1831, was impressed by slavery, saw the sights of Baltimore, including the two monuments, talked with the aged Carroll and admired the women’s beauty. He went to Ellicott’s Mills by the new railroad and thence by stage through Frederick and Hagerstown and over the mountains toward the west (80a).

In 1831 and 1832, H: Tudor (81) came through the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal to Baltimore, of whose appearance from the water he speaks, as he does of its women, its houses, and its monuments. He talks of slavery, and of Carroll, of canvas-back ducks, and of the Baltimore and Ohio trains, and goes to Washington, Cumberland and Frederick. We have an anonymous sketch of a trip to Chambersburg (82), to Hagerstown and Frederick in 1832, 17 and also E. T. Coke’s (83) narrative of his trip across the State by the Frenchtown route to Washington. He notes the beauty of Baltimore’s women, sees the exchange and the churches and goes westward on the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal by Point of Rocks, to Harper’s Ferry, and returns to Baltimore via Ellicott’s Mills. The beauty of its women and the hospitality of Baltimore are also spoken of by C. D. Arfwedson (84), who arrived in the city in time to see the funeral of Charles Carroll of Carrollton, which he describes. He speaks of the slaves and the commerce of the town, of the monuments and the exchange. He later returned from the west, went from Cumberland to Frederick and Point of Rocks by stage and thence to Baltimore drawn by the Baltimore and Ohio horse cars. C. J. Latrobe (85) also went over the Baltimore and Ohio from Baltimore to Point of Rocks. His remarks on the Chesapeake are interesting, as are those on Carroll, and the society and strawberry parties he saw. In 1833, I. Finch (86) visited Fort Washington, and St. Mary’s, and about this time Tyrone Power (87) came to Baltimore by the Elk River route, and wrote of the commerce and the races, Gilmor’s gallery and the Front St. Theatre, the changes of temperature, the suburbs and Patapsco Neck, of fox hunting and ducking. He went also along the Gunpowder, and from Washington to the Falls of the Potomac, by way of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal.

In 1834, E. S. Abdy (88) was impressed by the condition of the slaves and the free blacks in Baltimore; G. W. Featherstonhaugh (89) ate canvas-back duck and crabs at Barnum’s, and then went to Frederick and Harper’s Ferry; and A. Reed and J. Matheson (90) came to Baltimore, conversed with an elder of the Methodist church, and commented on the slaves and monuments.

Michael Chevalier (91) wrote of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal and of the Bank Mob of 1835, and Miss Harriet Martineau (92) made mention of the education of the Baltimore children and of the slavery she found there. Cox and Hoby (92a) came to visit the Baptist churches, and tell of the hospitality received from Messrs. Levering and Wilson, and of the flour mills. Grund’s “Aristocracy in America” (93) speaks of a trip by the Baltimore and Ohio from Baltimore to Washington in 1836, and J. Logan (94) came from Frenchtown to Baltimore and speaks of the heated railroad cars he found in the State. He stopped at Peale’s Hotel, not at the 18 Fountain or Barnum’s, and did not regret his choice. In 1836 too, Caroline Gilman (95) came from Harper’s Ferry to Baltimore on the Baltimore and Ohio, via Sykesville, finding a locomotive had been substituted for horse power over part of the journey. She speaks of the City Spring Square, the churches, the bricks, and the Bank Mob.

From 1838 to 1840, J. S. Buckingham (96) was thrice in Maryland. He saw the city rather thoroughly, discussed the public buildings, streets, government, schools, jail, newspapers, women, elections, slaves, free colored people, etc. He was present at Isaac McKim’s funeral, recounted the famous libel suit in which Rev. Dr. Breckinridge was involved, told of the Log Cabin presidential campaign, and of the suburbs. He went to Havre de Grace and Philadelphia and again to Harper’s Ferry, Frederick and Cumberland, whose situation he described. G: Combe (97) came to Baltimore in 1839, and travelled over the newly opened Philadelphia, Wilmington and Baltimore Railroad, being startled at the recklessness of the baggagemen. We have interesting glimpses of the Episcopalian church at this period from Waylen’s “Ecclesiastical Reminiscences” (98). He also speaks of Rev. Mr. Knapp at the First Baptist church, Baltimore, and tells of Elkton, Cockeysville, Rockville, and Havre de Grace. In the spring of 1840, Wills (98a) went from Washington to Baltimore and thence was drawn by horses for a mile or so and later by locomotives along the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad to Frederick, where he took stage for Hagerstown, Hancock, and Cumberland. He is impressed by the wildness of the Patapsco at Ellicott’s Mills, and goes into raptures over the scenery of the Alleghanies. A. M. Maxwell (99) went through Maryland in 1840, by the Frenchtown route and speaks of Elk River, the ducks, and the Battle of North Point, and in the same year T: C. Gratton (100) took the same route and tells of a railroad accident, of life on a plantation on the Chesapeake, the hospitality of the people, and the institution of slavery. Willis’ “American Scenery” (100a), published in 1840, contains a number of views of Baltimore and the Baltimore and Ohio viaduct at the Relay.

J. J. Gurney (101), a prominent English Quaker went from Baltimore to Harper’s Ferry, in 1841, and speaks of the religious conditions of the city, of Chief Justice Taney, of the jail, and the slaves. In the same year, J. Sturge (102) came to Baltimore and wrote of Elisha Tyson and the Quakers 19 and of Reverend Richard Fuller and the Baptists. He went to the slave pen with the poet Whittier. As Maryland was usually the first State visited by foreigners, the institution of slavery struck them forcibly here, and nearly every one mentions it, while most are shocked by it. Charles Lyell (103), the well-known geologist, came to Baltimore in 1841, and also speaks of slavery and of the paper money in circulation. He went to Frostburg via Frederick, Harper’s Ferry, Hagerstown, and Cumberland, and comments on the Alleghany Mountains, the Irish settlers, the iron mines and the immigrants going westward. In the next year, Charles Dickens (104) went through the State to Washington by rail and remarked on the Gunpowder River, Barnum’s Hotel, the State penitentiary, and the slaves, in his well-known “American Notes.” J. R. Godley (105) came shortly afterward and speaks of the effect of Dickens’ book, of the Colonization Society and the condition of the negro, of the Roman Catholic Church, the Baltimore almshouse, and a farm school which he visited.

Bayard Taylor (106) travelled from Port Deposit to Baltimore by steamer in 1844, and thence went on foot by night through Ellicott’s Mills to Washington, and complains of the inhospitable householders he met on the way. The next year, Mrs. Houston (107) was in Baltimore and went by railroad and coach, to Harper’s Ferry and Cumberland, interested in the mountains, finding the roads bad and the taverns but poor places. She crossed the Susquehanna by ferry on her way to Baltimore and describes the railway cars. Her description of the city and its hilly character is of interest. She saw the two churches which all travellers note, viz.: the Roman Catholic Cathedral and the Unitarian Church, remarked on the women, the monuments and the slaves, and encountered beggars and persons who ate with knives at table.

An anonymous traveller (108) went by coach and rail from Cumberland to Baltimore in 1846, by way of Harper’s Ferry, and describes our method of checking baggage, Barnum’s Hotel, and Peale’s Museum. In the same year, Alexander Mackay (109) visited Havre de Grace and Baltimore, and wrote of the women, the slaves, and the suburb of Canton. During the following years, Charles Lanman (110) saw and described the suburbs of Washington, the Glade country, the Cumberland region, the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal and the boat trade, Pierce’s Plantation, and Rock Creek with its church.

20 From Cumberland to Baltimore, Havre de Grace and Philadelphia, was the route of E. Davies (111), in 1847. He noted the system of checking baggage, the arrangement of railway cars, and the religious life of both whites and blacks in Baltimore. Contemporaneously, C. A. Goodrich (112) wrote of the monuments, the flour mills and churches of Baltimore, and of the North Point battlefield. In 1848, J. Dixon (113) went from Philadelphia to Baltimore via the Elk River, and noted the Methodist Church, the Cathedral, the slaves, and the monuments, and then crossed the Alleghanies, going to Cumberland by way of Harper’s Ferry. Benson J. Lossing (114) visited Elkton, Baltimore, and Annapolis, in the same year, making sketches for his fieldbook of the Revolution. In 1849, R. Baird (115) saw the monuments and Cathedral in Baltimore, and complained of the wretchedness of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, while Lady F. S. Wortley (116) devoted her attention to Baltimore’s flour mills, shot tower, custom house, bridges, Cathedral, monuments, Barnum’s Hotel, and the suburb of Canton. Fort McHenry, the oysters, the busy streets in Baltimore, some of them occupied by railway tracks on which trains passed, interested A. Cunynghame (117) in 1850, and soon afterwards L. B. Mackinnon (118) wrote of the clipper ships, the cotton duck manufactures, and the fine hospitality of Baltimore. F. and T. Pulszky (119) visited Baltimore and Annapolis in 1851 and 1852. Of the former place they give an interesting description, touching on the people, the monuments, and the negroes in prison. They stopped at the Eutaw House. Their description of Annapolis is also of interest. They speak of the religious toleration, of the slavery found in the State, of the capitol and the Governor’s mansion, then occupied by Enoch Louis Lowe, of the Naval Academy and of the dinner given to Kossuth. About this time, J. W. Hengiston (120) wrote a magazine article on Baltimore, Washington, the Chesapeake and the Potomac, trading of the slaves, the steamboats, the Roman Catholic Church, the women, and the poor farming land he saw. In 1852, M. Finch (121) came to Baltimore, and her experiences seem to have impressed her chiefly with the Unitarian Church, the Quakers, and the slaves. Ele Bowen’s “Rambles” (122) belong to this period and give a full and entertaining history and description of the Baltimore and Ohio, as far as Oakland, and of the coal mining in Allegany county. Four travellers date their impressions from 1853: W. 21 Chambers (123) came through Havre de Grace to Baltimore and Washington, noting especially the negro cabin on the steamboat in which he crossed the Susquehanna; H. A. Murray (124) went to Guy’s Hotel in Baltimore and wrote of the fine food he had, of the theatres, and of the volunteer fire companies; F. L. Olmsted (125) told of the life of the slaves on Mr. C.’s farm; and A. Bunn (126) wrote of the canvas-back ducks and the carelessness in shooting, with which he was impressed during his visit to Baltimore. Among the biographies of Maryland men who flourished during the middle of the nineteenth century a few are noted below (126a).

Three more voyagers visited Baltimore in 1854: J. Shaw (127) speaks chiefly of the women of the city; C. R. Weld (128) also pays his tribute to them, visits the Maryland Institute and Agricultural Fairs, and, entering the State from the west, goes from Cumberland to the Relay and Washington, and takes steamer from Richmond to Baltimore; while R. Everest (129), going from Philadelphia to Washington by rail, devotes his remarks to slavery and to the geology of the country.

Wm. Ferguson (130), noted the grain crops, the Patapsco valley and the Alleghany Mountains, in 1855, while travelling through Havre de Grace, Baltimore, Ellicott’s Mills, Point of Rocks, Cumberland, and Piedmont. Brantz Mayer’s (131) June jaunt, in 1856, also took him through the mountains of Western Maryland. J: W. von Müller (132) visited Baltimore in that year, noting the monuments and the Cathedral and was interested in the cowcatchers on the locomotives. In the same year, A. Pairpoint (133) stopped at the Maltby House in Baltimore, and jotted down his impressions of the trade and markets, the railroads and the mules, the churches and monuments, and, of course, of the negroes. F. L. Olmsted (134) again visited the State, went from Baltimore to Cumberland by rail, and made notes of the blacks, the Cumberland mines, and the Alleghany Mountains.

Chas. Mackay (135) saw Baltimore in 1858, and was impressed by the mountains and canvas-back ducks. He also discusses slave breeding and speaks of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. Over the Baltimore and Ohio road, D. H. Strother (136) took his artist’s excursion in the same year. Gobright’s guide (137) to Baltimore was issued in 1858.

In 1860, the visit of the Prince of Wales to Baltimore is 22 described by Cornwallis (138) and Woods (139), the latter also speaking of the mobs and the new police force. Early in 1861, Lossing (140) visited Havre de Grace and Baltimore to make sketches for his field-book of the War of 1812.

With the beginning of the American Civil war in 1861, we come to a period, in which more persons visited the State of Maryland, than in any equal number of years before or since. It is true, most of these came as soldiers and their account is chiefly of warlike events, of movements of troops, and of armed encounters. Yet in many a war-time narrative, there is found a description of the country through which the troops marched. Hardly a regimental history has been published in which a march through Maryland is mentioned, without there being mention, at the same time, of the strong Union spirit and beautiful scenery of Western Maryland, or of the secession proclivities of Southern Maryland.

In the streets of Baltimore occurred the first bloodshed of the war, on April 19, 1861 (141). Governor Hicks and the Union men with Federal assistance prevented the State from seceding, but the Secret Service found many secessionist sympathizers in the State, and careful repression of them was practised (142). Many men went South and fought through the war (142a) in the Confederate army. Gen. B: F. Butler commanded the Federal troops at the Relay House and took possession of Federal Hill, thus gaining military control of Baltimore (142b). During these troubled weeks, when passage through Baltimore was impracticable Federal troops were carried by boat from the Susquehanna River to Annapolis and thence to the District of Columbia.

A number of regiments were kept in Annapolis and camped there (143) in 1861. An occasional traveller, like Jones (144), who noted the railroad in the Baltimore streets and admired the Alleghany Mountains, came to the State in that year. Anthony Trollope (145) crossed the Susquehanna by ferry, found Baltimore attractive, wrote of the terrapin and ducks, saw Union soldiers on Federal Hill, and noted the secession feeling of many of the people. To Baltimore came “Bull Run” Russell, who also visited Doughoregan Manor, enjoyed the hospitality of the Maryland Club, and shot ducks on the Chesapeake (146).

A camp of Union soldiers was placed at Patterson Park (147). The first Maryland Union regiment was organized at the Relay, came to Baltimore for a while, then marched 23 to Hagerstown and guarded the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal and the Potomac fords during the winter of 1861 and 1862 (148). A number of regiments went through Baltimore to Washington by rail (149), but others made more extensive marches through the State. Thus the First New Hampshire was at Rockville in June, and thence marched to Darnestown, Poolesville, the Monocacy, and by Point of Rocks, to Williamsport, where they crossed the Potomac (150).

The 1st Rhode Island Regiment guarded the railroad from Annapolis to Washington, then went to Williamsport, and next marched to Washington, by way of Hagerstown and Frederick (151). Maine troops, who were stationed in Baltimore for a time, went to Harper’s Ferry later by the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad (152). Along the Potomac were a number of skirmishes (153), and some regiments crossed to meet the terrible disaster of Ball’s Bluff.

The expeditions to Southern Maryland such as that sent to Upper Marlboro to overawe the Secession party at the elections of November, 1861, give us almost all the accounts of that part of the State to be found in the last half century (154). In November, also, an expedition was made to Worcester county (155). In the latter part of 1861, we find the 87th Pennsylvania guarding the Northern Central and Baltimore and Ohio Railroads and wintering in and about Baltimore (156), in which city the 5th New York (157), and other regiments were also quartered for a time. When the 114th New York Regiment was quartered there in 1862, one of its historians speaks with pleasure of the Union men of Baltimore, and especially of Judge H. L. Bond (158). Guarding the railroads was an important duty for several regiments. The 11th Pennsylvania was stationed for a while between Havre de Grace and Elkton (159), but we have more narratives of regiments, which did provost and patrol duty in the neighborhood of Annapolis Junction and Annapolis (160), from which place several regiments embarked by steamer in January, 1862 (161). Other regiments spent the winter in the vicinity of Budd’s Ferry on the Potomac (162), or at Bladensburg (163), while still others merely passed through the State on their way to the National Capital (164). Along the upper Potomac, in the vicinity of Poolesville (165), of Edward’s Ferry, of Darnestown, Conrad’s Ferry, Point of Rocks, Sandy Hook, Buckeystown, Frederick, Williamsport, and Hancock, several regiments guarded the north bank of the river (166). Some of 24 these regiments, as for example the 2nd and 12th Massachusetts, wintered at Frederick, where there was a large hospital on the State camp ground. The only skirmish of note was one at Hancock in January, 1862 (167). Picket duty along the upper Potomac occupied some regiments all of 1862 (168), while other narratives tell merely of passing through Baltimore (169), or of journeys from Harper’s Ferry to Annapolis (170). Still other troops guarded the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad from Baltimore to Washington (171), and we have an account of an expedition through lower Maryland towards Fredericksburg in December, 1862 (172). Guard duty, on the railroad from Baltimore to Havre de Grace (173), and in and around Baltimore, is described by several regimental historians (174).

The great event of 1862, however, was Lee’s invasion of Maryland, leading to the battles of South Mountain and of Antietam. Of his occupation of Frederick and of the truth or inaccuracy of Whittier’s poem of Barbara Fritchie, we have several accounts (175); while, of the campaign as a whole and of the two battles it contained, the narratives are most numerous (176). Later in the year came a raid on Poolesville (177). An interesting series of articles from an anonymous hand in the Leisure Hour Magazine describe conditions on the Eastern Shore about this time (177a).

In 1863, we have a few narratives of scouting, etc., in Western Maryland (178), one of an expedition to Upper Marlboro (179), two of railway journeys from Baltimore to Harper’s Ferry (180), two of events at Annapolis (181), another of a Confederate prisoner’s escape from Point Lookout (182). We have also an account of Havre de Grace and Baltimore from an English traveller, who noted the duck shooting, Druid Hill Park, the races, the shot tower, the hospitality of the people, and the effect of the war (183). There was a slight skirmish at Seneca Mills early in June (184), but the great number of accounts of journeys through the State in this year are those of the regiments who passed through Maryland on their way to and from Gettysburg (185). In 1864, G. A. Sala visited Baltimore and commented on the “Secesh women” there (186), and there are several narratives of guard and hospital duty performed at that city (187), at Annapolis (188), and at the military prison at Point Lookout (189). The 133d Ohio passed through the State, from Cumberland to Washington (190), and the 32nd Maine, from Baltimore to Washington (191).

25 A number of minor skirmishes took place in Western Maryland in the early summer of 1864 (192), and Early’s raid in July, with its fateful battle at the Monocacy, is described by a number of hands (193). In August, there was a skirmish or so (194), and one or two more occurred in the autumn (195). A raid, on Cumberland in February, 1865 (196), a capture of a vessel on the Chesapeake in April (197), and the war was over. The troops returned to their homes (198), and travellers began to visit Baltimore (199) and the scenes of the battles (200). For example, Trowbridge described the Antietam valley (201). There are only a few novels dealing at any length of Maryland life during the war (202), and but few of Maryland’s leading men have received due recognition in published works (203).

In 1866, H. Latham (204) commented on finding railway tracks in Baltimore streets, and in 1867, Mrs. G. Clerk (205) saw Baltimore with its monuments and Annapolis with the Naval Academy, and the State Legislature.

F. B. Zincke (206) was impressed in 1867, as Latham had been, with the railway and speaks also of the strong Southern sentiment he found in Baltimore. G. J. Chester’s (207) sketchy and bright pages allude to the Cathedral and the monuments, to St. Paul’s Church and to the red brick houses which he saw in Baltimore in 1868; and in 1869 “Two Englishmen” (208) remark on the trains in the city’s streets. Bayard Taylor’s article on the Eastern Shore in Harper’s Magazine is the source of the well-known quotation in reference to the excellence of the Ocean City beach (209).

Charles Kingsley (210) drove through Druid Hill Park in 1871, enjoyed the hospitality of the Monumental city, drove to P.’s country place, attended the Episcopalian convention, and went through the Baltimore and Potomac tunnel. The appearance of the city and environs at this time was described by J. C. Carpenter for “Bryant’s Picturesque America” (211). From the early seventies date Yelverton’s (212) remarks on Baltimore, the Civil war, the Chesapeake and its oysters; and Watkins’ (213) account of a dinner at the St. Clair Hotel in Baltimore.

Edward King (214) visited Baltimore in 1874, speaks of the foreign trade, the grain elevators, iron manufactures, canning of oysters and fruit, and of the trade in sugar and tobacco. He visited Federal Hill and Canton, and alludes to the railroads which enter the city. Reference is made to 26 the City Hall, the churches and charitable institutions, the Maryland Institute, and the projected Johns Hopkins University. By the Baltimore and Ohio he travelled from Baltimore to Cumberland, and he also visited Annapolis. A seldom described portion of the State was traversed by N. H. Bishop (215) in the same year, when, in his paper canoe, he paddled through the Chincoteague Bay, writing of birds, fish and oysters, and the legend that Whalley the regicide settled in that vicinity. Robert Wilson (216) also travelled on the Eastern Shore about the same time and wrote of the Peninsula, of the Bay, with its products: ducks and fish, oysters, crabs, and terrapin, of the town of Crisfield and of the industries of the Eastern Shore and of Queen Anne’s and Kent Counties. From this period also dates Captain Willard Glazier’s work (217), which is virtually a guidebook to Baltimore and the Druid Hill Park, referring also to the Grand Army of the Republic, and the events of 1861.

In 1878, Sir G: Campbell (218) visited Baltimore and stayed at the Mt. Vernon Hotel. He was much interested in the new Johns Hopkins University and in the condition of the negro. He speaks of the street gutters, of the Athenaeum and Maryland Clubs and of some prominent men he met: such as Francis King, Governor Whyte and Governor McLane. G. A. Sala (219) came to Baltimore and spent a Sunday there at the Mt. Vernon in 1879. He describes the town, its churches and its monuments. Probably in this year Baltimore was visited by two Germans, Frederick Bodenstedt (220) and C. Stangl (221). The latter writes concerning the bridges over the Susquehanna and the Gunpowder. Another German, Hermann Zschokke (222), visited Baltimore and Ilchester, Woodstock and Annapolis in 1880. He was especially interested in the Roman Catholics and visited their churches, parochial schools and other institutions. In Baltimore, he also noted the hospitality of the people, and the preparations for the Sesqui-centennial celebration of the anniversary of founding the city. He went to Fort McHenry and the City Hall, and saw the parks, shot tower, Peabody Institute, hospitals, and monuments. He was interested in the negroes, and saw the Naval Academy at Annapolis, and the monitors then lying at the wharf there. Lady Duffus Hardy (223) came about this time, described the shops and residences of Baltimore, its parks and monuments, and complained of its ill-paved streets.

F. Mayer’s (224) description of old Baltimore merchants 27 was printed in 1880, and in 1881, Joel Cook (225) came from Philadelphia to Baltimore and described Elkton and the country along the road. He visited Fort McHenry, Lexington Market, Greenmount Cemetery, Bay View Almshouse, Druid Hill Park, and Mt. Vernon Place. W. H. Russell (226) and A. Sutter (227) visited Baltimore in the same year and the latter crossed the basin in the ferry. He also visited Cumberland and speaks of the farmland of the State. T. S. Hudson (228) was interested in the oyster packing industry, and the grain trade of Baltimore in 1882, and an anonymous traveller, who stopped at the Carrollton House (229), noted the passage of railway trains through some of the streets, street cars drawn by mules, the City Hall, Fort McHenry, and the Park.

J. Hatton (230) came to Baltimore on a snowy day about Christmas time, 1883, and tells of the horn blowing which was characteristic of the season, of the street cars, the signs on shops, street venders, the appearance of Baltimore street, the women, and the Academy of Music. E. von Hesse Wartegg (231) visited the city about the same time, and was charmed with it. He refers to the women, the monuments, the trade, the parks, the negroes, the German inhabitants, and the saloons. J. E. Raum (232) visited Baltimore and Annapolis in 1884, and J. T. Rothrock (233) cruised in the Chesapeake in the same year.

We now come to a break of five years without travellers, until W. G. Blaikie visited Baltimore in 1889 (234), and noted the Peabody Institute, the Hopkins University, the Park, and the serpentine stone used for some of the buildings. A year later, Max O’Rell (235) called Baltimore a middle class city and was charmed, as is every one, with the beauties of Druid Hill Park, for whose acquisition Baltimoreans owe gratitude to Governor Thomas Swann. A. Craib (236) went through the State from Washington to Philadelphia about this time, stopped at Aberdeen and attended the First Congregational Church in Baltimore. The late Prof. G: H. Williams of the Hopkins printed notes of excursions made by him and his geological classes in various parts of the State (237). This work begun by him, and carried on by his successor, Prof. Win. B. Clark, has developed into the valuable Maryland Geological Survey.

The great number of travellers coming to attend the World’s Columbian Exposition of 1893, was partially the cause of the appearance of a number of guide-books about 28 the same time, dealing with Maryland in whole or part. We have no record of any of the travellers save a brief reference made to Baltimore and Locust Point by L. Claretie (238) in 1892.

C. D. Wilson (239) wrote of the Eastern Shore as the “Land of the Epicure,” about this period, and Dean S. R. Hole (240) described his visit to Baltimore in 1894, referring to the monuments, the Peabody, and the Johns Hopkins. Mrs. H. W. Ridgely’s (241) entertaining record of her researches through the old brick churches was published in 1894, and, in that year, Lady Theodora Guest (242) passed through Havre de Grace to Baltimore and visited Eutaw Place, the Park, and Walters’ Picture Gallery. A. Lutaud (243), a Frenchman, visited Baltimore and Annapolis in 1895, and remarked on the trolley roads, the narrow streets, the Walters’ Gallery, Mt. Vernon Place, the Johns Hopkins Hospital and University, and the other schools. He also described the Naval Academy.

J. Edgeworth’s Maryland memories (244) of the Piedmont region and of plantation life appeared about this time as did C. D. Wilson’s article on the Eastern Shore (245). In 1898, C. W. Bump (246) travelled “Down the historic Susquehanna” and, a year or two later, Rufus R. Wilson (247) rambled along the Eastern Shore. About the close of the nineteenth century, T. A. Glenn’s “Some Colonial Mansions” contained sketches of Bohemia Manor, the Carrolls, and Prestons at Patuxent (248), and Powell’s “Historic Towns” (249) included sketches on Baltimore by St. G. L. Sioussat and on Annapolis and Frederick by Mrs. S. A. Shafer. A brief article on Kent Island by Bernard C. Steiner described an excursion in November, 1903 (250).

A number of novels deal with Maryland life since the close of the Civil War (251) and several biographical works (252) and recent guide-books (253) may be noted. No list of descriptions of Maryland would be complete without a reference to the descriptions of the Walters’ Art Collections (254).


29

BIBLIOGRAPHY.

(1)

1526

AYLLON, LUCAS VASQUEZ DE.  See Winsor, Justin.  Narrative and critical history of America.  2 v. (1886), v. 2, pp. 240-241.

(2)

1566-1573

S., J. G.  Early Spanish explorations and adventures in Chesapeake Bay.  Historical Magazine, 1859, v. iii, pp. 268-270, 1570.  Fr. Segura landed on the shores of the Chesapeake.  Maryland Historical Society.  Fund Publication No. 7, 1874, p. 122.

1573

CONWAY, ROBINSON.  An account of discoveries in the West, 1848, pp. 481-491; Communication from Robert Greenhow, Esq., stating that the Spaniards, in 1566, had knowledge of, and in 1573, visited a bay called Santa Maria, in the latitude of thirty-seven degrees; and suggesting that this bay must have been the Chesapeake.

(3)

1608

SMITH, J:, Capt. Works; ed. by E: Arber.  1884, pp. 412-419.  (Chapter v, 55-58).  See also Adventures and discourses; ed. by J. Ashton, n. d., pp. 129-141.  American Colonial Tracts No. 6, Oct., 1898.  Description of the Province of New Albion, pp. v, 16 and 22.  SMITH, Capt. J:  True travels, adventures and observations.  2 v., 1819.  v. 1, pp. 182-184.  Scharf, Hist. of Md., v. 1, and Bozman, Hist of Md., v. 1.

(4)

1633-34

WHITE, ANDREW, S. J.  Maryland Historical Society.  Fund Publication No. 7, 1874.  Narrative of a voyage to Maryland.

Maryland Historical Society.  Fund Publication No. 35, pp. 26-45.  “A briefe relation of the voyage unto Maryland.”

FORCE, P:, Col.  Tracts and other papers relating to the origin, settlement and progress of the Colonies of North America.  Vol. iv, No. xii.  A relation of the colony of the Lord Baron of Baltimore, in Maryland, near Virginia; by Father Andrew White.

1634

MAYER, B., ed.  A relation of, The successfull beginnings of the Lord Baltemore’s Plantation in Maryland.  1865.
(See note on these three forms of Father White’s report in Steiner’s Beginnings of Md.  21 J. H. U. Studies.)

1634-35

The Relation of 1634 was revised and reissued in 1635 and this too was reprinted in 1865, ed. by F. L. Hawks.

See also BRUCE, E: C.  The settlement of Maryland (St. Inigo’s).  Lippincott’s Magazine, vol. viii, July, 1871, pp. 36-51.

30

(5)

Calvert Papers, Maryland Historical Society.  Fund Publications Nos. 28 and 34.

CALVERT, LEONARD (1606?-47).  Life; by G: W. Burnap.  SPARKS, J.  Library of American Biography (new series), 1864, v. 9, pp. 5-229.

See also BELKNAP, JEREMY.  American Biography, 1877, v. 3, pp. 206-224.

(6)

Archives of Md. (ed. by W: H. Browne and published for the State by the Md. Historical Society) containing: Provincial Court Proceedings, 2 vols., 1636-1657; Council Proceedings, 6 vols., 1636-1698; Assembly Proceedings, 7 vols., 1637-1701.

(7)

1655

STRONG, LEONARD.  Babylon’s Fall in Maryland.

LANGEFORD, JOHN.   A just and clear refutation of a false and scandalous pamphlet, entitled Babylon’s Fall in Maryland, etc.

FORCE, P:, Col., comp.  Tracts and other papers, relating principally to the origin, settlement and progress of the Colonies of North America.  Vol. iii, No. xiv.  Leah and Rachel, or the two fruitful sisters Virginia and Maryland; by J: Hammond.

FORCE, P:, Col., comp.  Tracts and other papers, relating principally to the origin, settlement and progress of the Colonies of North America.  Vol. ii, No. ix.  The Lord Baltamore’s printed Case, uncased and answered.  Shewing the illegality of his patent and usurpation of Royal Jurisdiction.  Also, A short relation of the Papists late Rebellion against the government of his Highness, the Lord Protector.

(8)

1659

HERMAN, A:  Journal of the Dutch Embassy to Maryland.  O’Callaghan, E. B., and Fernow, B., eds. Documents relating to the colonial history of New York.  14 v, 1856-83.  v. 2, pp. 88-100.—A copy of the Will of Augustine Herman may be found in the “Penna. Mag. of History and Biography,” v. 15, pp. 321-326.

(9)

1666

ALSOP, GEORGE.  A character of the Province of Maryland.  Maryland Historical Society.  Fund Publication No. 15, 1880.

1669

FORCE, P:, Col., comp.  Tracts and other papers, relating principally to the origin, settlement, and progress of the Colonies of North America.  Vol. iii, No. vii.  A true relation of Virginia and Maryland; by Nathaniel Shrigley.  1669.

1685?

CROUCH, NATHANIEL (RORERT BURTON, ps.).  English Empire in America.  London, 1685.  Seventh edition, pub. 1729.  Chapter viii.  View of Maryland.

N. N.  America: or an exact description of the West Indies.  1655.

(9a)

1630-40

BABCOCK, W: H:  The Tower of Wye.  (Isle of Kent.)

31

1628

THRUSTON, Lucy M.  Mistress Brent.  A story of Lord Baltimore’s colony in 1638.  (St. Mary’s county and Isle of Kent.)

1644

GOODWIN, MAUD WILDER.  Sir Christopher.  A romance of a Maryland Manor in 1644.  (St. Mary’s county.)

1680-1708

BOWEN, L. P.  The days of Makemie.  1885.

1681

KENNEDY, J: P.  Rob of the Bowl.  A legend of St. Inigoes.  (St. Mary’s county.)

1684

KENNEDY, J: P.  A legend of Maryland.  Atlantic Monthly, vol. vi, July, 1860, pp. 29-44, 141-152.
Also in At home and abroad.  1872, pp. 37-87.  A legend of Maryland.

(10)

1679

DANKERS, J., and SLUYTER, P:  Journal of a voyage to New York, and a tour in several of the American colonies in 1679-80.  1867, pp. 193-212, 214-221.

1660-188-

MALLERY, C: P.  Ancient families of Bohemia Manor.  Papers of the Historical Society of Delaware, 1888.

(10a)

1672

FOX, G:  Journal, n. d., pp. 455-457.  Entered Md. between the Bohemia and Sassafras Rivers; waded the Chester River; to Robert Harwood’s at Miles River; to John Edmundson’s; to the Kentish Shore; to Wm. Wilcock’s; to Tredhaven Creek; to John Edmundson’s; the Choptank River and its numerous boats; along the Chesapeake, passing Crane’s Island, Swan’s Island, and Kent Island; crossed the Chesapeake Bay; to the head of the Bay; to Hatton’s Island; George Wilson’s; James Frizby’s; to Severn; to the Western Shore; William Coale’s; Abraham Birkhead’s; Peter Sharp’s on the Clifts; to James Preston’s on the Patuxent.

For this period see also:

1684

WHITEHEAD, W: A.  East Jersey under the Proprietary governments, p. 300.  Patrick Falconer’s letter to Maurice Trent, Elizabeth Toun in East Jersey, the 28th of October, 1684.  “I have also travelled in Maryland, I cannot but say it is a good Countrey, but its possessed with a Debauched, Idle, Lasy People, all that they Labour for is only as much Bread as serves them for one Season, and as much Tobacco as may furnish them with Cloaths.  I believe it is the worst improved Countrey in the world, for the Indian wheat is that they trust to, and if that fail them they may expect to starve.”

(11)

1698-1738

CHALKLEY, T:  Collection of the works of, 1791.  (1698, pp. 15-16, 23; 1701, p. 33; 1703, pp. 38-39, 47-48; 1706, pp. 48-50; 1713, p. 82; 1715, p. 83; 1717, p. 89; 1720, p. 106; 1721, p. 106; 1725, pp. 150-151, 162-164; 1732, p. 260; 1738, pp. 308-310, 312-313, 499-502.)

1691, 1696, 1697, 1713

DICKINSON, JAMES.  Journal, etc., 1745.  Friends (Quakers) on either shore of the Chesapeake, pp. 52-53, 97-98, 112, 145.

(12)

1697

JONES, HUGH.  Royal Philosophical Society transactions and collections.  V. 3, p. 600.

32

1686-1700

See also BLOME, R:  The present state of his Majestie’s isles and territories in America, from the year 1686-1700.

(13)

1656-1729

BRAY, T:  A short historical account of Dr. Bray’s life and designs; by Rev. Richard Rawlinson.  Maryland Historical Society.  Fund Publication No. 37.  Ed. by B. C. Steiner, 1901.

Letter relating to the state of the P. E. Church in Maryland; also in Collections of the Prot. Episc. Historical Society for the year 1851, pp. 99-107.

REV. THOMAS BRAY:  See Sewanee Review, July, 1903, article by Bernard C. Steiner.

(14)

1703-1704

KEITH, G:  Journal.  Collections of the Protestant Episcopal Historical Society for the year 1851, pp. 39-42, 46-47.

(14a)

1700-19

STANLEY, HARVEY.  Pilate and Herod.  A tale illustrative of the early history of the Church of England in the province of Maryland.  1853.  (Principally St. Mary’s county.)

(15)

1705?

COOK, EBEN.  Sot-weed Factor, 1708.  Md. Hist. Soc. Fund Pub. No. 36.  Ed. by Bernard C. Steiner.

(16)

1728?

COOK, EBEN.  The Sot-weed Redivivus, 1730.  Md. Hist. Soc.  Fund Pub. No. 36.  Ed. by Bernard C. Steiner.

(16a)

17--

CAREW, BAMFYLDE-MOORE (1693-1770).  Life and adventures of; by R. Goadby.  n. d., pp. 56-82.

See also BLUETT, T:  Some memoirs of the life of Job, the High Priest of Boonda in Africa, who was a slave about two years in Maryland.  1734.

(17)

1717-1718

HOLME, B: (1682-1749).  Works, with life, 1753, pp. 23, 27.

For a somewhat later period, see:

GRIFFITH, J: (1713-76).  A journal of life, etc., in the ministry.  1779, pp. 370, 381-382.

1746, 1748

WOOLMAN, J: (1720-72).  Journal; ed. by J: G. Whittier, 1884, pp. 70-72, 76.

(17a)

1739-1740

WHITEFIELD, Rev. G:  Journal of a voyage from London to Savannah in Georgia, 1739-1743.  2 v. in 1.  V. 1, Pt. 5, pp. 56-62.  North East; Susquehanna Ferry; Joppa; Newtown (Baltimore); Annapolis; Upper Marlborough; Piscataway; Portobacco; and the Potomac River.  V. 2, Pt. 2, pp. 76-77.  Nottingham to Bohemia; to St. George s.

(18)

1747, 1754

WASHINGTON, G:  Journal 1747-1754.  Ed. by J. M. Toner.  3 v., 1893.  V. 1, pp. 30-34; v. 3, pp. 30, 48-51, 65.

(19)

1748

KALM, PETER.  Travels into North America, contained in PINKERTON, J:, comp.  Collection of voyages and travels.  17 vols., v. 13, p. 380.

33

Original:  KALM (P.).  En Resa til Norra America, pa Kongl.  Swenska Wetenstaps Academiens befallning, och publici kostnad, sörrättad af Pehr Kalm, Professor i Abo.  Stockholm, 1753-1761.

(19a)

1743

HINKE, W: J., and KEMPER, C: E., eds.  Moravian diaries of travels through Virginia.  Extracts from the diary of Leonard Schnell and Robert Hussey of their journey to Georgia, Nov. 6, 1743 - Apr. 10, 1744.  Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, v. xi, No. 4, April, 1904, p. 372.

1748

HINKE, W: J., and KEMPER, C: E., eds.  Moravian diaries of travels through Virginia.  Bro. Gottschalk.  Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, v. xi, No. 3, Jan., 1904, pp. 225-237.

1749

HINKE, W: J., and KEMPER, C: E., eds.  Moravian diaries of travels through Virginia.  Leonard Schnell and J: Brandmüller.  Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, v. xi, No. 2, Oct., 1903, pp. 115-118.

1753

HINKE, W: J., and KEMPER, C: E., eds.  Diary of the journey of the first colony of Single Brethren to North Carolina.  Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, v. xii, No. 2, Oct., 1904, pp. 140-141.

(20)

1755

EVANS, LEWIS.  Geographical, historical, political, and mechanical essays, 1755, pp. 6-8, 22-24.

(21)

1752

DOUGLASS, W.  North America.  2 v., 1760, v. 2, pp. 353-384.

See also BURTON, R.  English empire in America, 1729, pp. 113-117.

17--

OLDMIXON, J:  British Empire in America.  London, 1708, 2 vols.

MARTIN, B:  America.  3 v., 1755-1759.  (Plans of Ft. Frederick.)

GOLDSMITH, J.  Present state of the British Empire in Europe, Asia, Africa, and America.  1767.

JENYNS, S.  European settlements in America.  2 v., 1766, v. 2, pp. 210-216.

(21a)

1744

POTTER, M. H.  The house of de Mailly.  (Annapolis.)

(22)

1750-54

GIST, CHRISTOPHER.  Journals; ed. by W: M. Darlington, 1893.  1750, p. 32; 1751, pp. 68-69; 1753, p. 80; 1754, p. 86.

(23)

1753-69

SHARPE, HORATIO.  Correspondence of.  Ed. by W: H. Browne.  Archives of Maryland, 3 vols., 1888-95.

1754

ROWLAND, KATE MASON.  The Maryland delegates to the Albany Congress.  Dixie; vol. ii, Sept., 1891, pp. 274-299.

(24)

1755

DULANY, DANIEL.  Military and political affairs in the middle colonies in 1755. Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography, v. iii, 1879, pp. 11-31.

34

DULANY, DANIEL.  Maryland gossip in 1755.  Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography, v. iii, 1879, pp. 144-149.

(25)

1760

BURNABY, ANDREW.  Travels through the middle settlements in North America, contained in PINKERTON, J:, comp.  Collection of voyages and travels.  17 vols., v. 13, pp. 725-727.

See BURNABY, A.  Travels through the middle settlements in North America, in the years 1759 and 1760; with observations upon the state of the colonies, London, 1775.  Revised, corrected and greatly enlarged by the author, London, 1798.

BURNABY, A.  Voyage dans les colonies du milieu de l’Amérique Septentrionale, sait en 1759 et 1760.  Tr. par M. Wild.  Lausanne, 1778.

BURNABY, A.  Reisen durch die Mittlern Kolonien der Engländer in Nord-Amerika; von C. D. Ebeling.  Hamburg und Kiel, 1776.

About this time appeared BURKE, EDMUND.  Account of the European settlements in America, 2 vols., 1760, v. 2, pp. 226-233.

AULD, JAMES.  Journal, 1765-1770.  Southern History Association, v. viii, No. 4, July, 1904, pp. 255-256.

(25a)

ROGERS, Maj. ROBERT.  Concise account of North America.  London, 1765, p. 264.

1755

HULBERT, ARCHER B.  Historic highways of America: Braddock’s Road.  1903.

(25b)

1755

LOWDERMILK, WILL H.  History of Cumberland, etc.  1878, pp. xxiv-xlix.  Gen. Braddock’s orderly book at Frederick and Cumberland.

HULBERT, ARCHER B.  Historic highways of America: Pioneer roads and experiences of travellers.  (Vol. 1.) 1904, pp. 28, 53, 68.

HULBERT, ARCHER B.  Historic highways of America: Washington’s Road. 1903.

1806-

HULBERT, ARCHER B.  Historic highways of America: The Cumberland Road. 1904.

SEARIGHT, T: B.  The old pike.  1894.  (A history of the National Road.)

HULBERT, ARCHER B.  The Old National Road.  1901.

(26)

1760-65, 1774-1813

OTTERBEIN, PHILIP W: (1726-1813).  Life; by A. W. Drury.
For sketches of other ministers of the Reformed Church, see HARBAUGH, H:  Fathers of the Reformed Church.  6 vols.

(27)

1769-1777

EDDIS, W:  Letters from America, 1792.

1760-1775

See also CHURCHILL, WINSTON.  Richard Carvel, 1902.  (Carvel Hall, Annapolis.)

35

17--

Bordley Family.  Biographical sketches; by E. Bordley Gibson, 1865.

For descriptions of life in Maryland in later Provincial times, see:

MAYER, BRANTZ.  Old Maryland manners.  Scribner’s Monthly, vol. xvii, January, 1879.

LOSSING, BENSON J.  Historic buildings of America: The Maryland State-House.  Potter’s American Monthly, vol. iv, No. 38, February, 1875, pp. 81-87.

PALMER, J: W.  Old Maryland homes and ways.  Century Magazine, vol. xxvii, No. 2, December, 1894, pp. 244-261.

PALMER, J: W.  Certain worthies and dames of old Maryland.  Century Magazine, vol. xxix, No. 4, February, 1896, pp. 483-499.

RANDALL, T. H:  Colonial Annapolis.  The Architectural Record, vol. i, No. 3, January-March, 1892, pp. 309-343.

1771

RILEY, ELIHU S.  The first theatre in America (Annapolis).  Dixie, vol. ii, Oct., 1899, pp. 364-370.

17--

RILEY, ELIHU S.  The Athens of America.  Dixie, vol. ii, August, 1899, pp. 156-182.

For another old family see: Ancient families of Virginia, Maryland, etc. (Brent family).  De Bow’s Review, vol. xxvi, May, 1859, pp. 487-502.

1763(?)-1779

CRESAP, THOMAS; by Stevenson, Mrs. M. L. C.  Ohio Arch. and Hist. Pub. No. 10, 1902, pp. 146-164.

EDEN, Sir ROBERT (1741-1784).  Life and administration; by Bernard C. Steiner.  Johns Hopkins University Studies.  Series xvi, Nos. 7-8-9, pp. 341-476.

(28)

1772-1815

ASBURY, FRANCIS (1745-1816).  Journal, 3 vols., 1852: 1772, v. 1, p. 26, Bohemia; p. 48, Deer Creek; pp. 53-54, Baltimore, Joppa, Charlestown, Bohemia; 1773, pp. 56-65, Bohemia, Susquehanna, Bush, Baltimore, Joppa, Neck, Deer Creek; pp. 67-68, Bohemia, Susquehanna, Baltimore; pp. 81-83, Deer Creek, Gunpowder Neck, Baltimore, Middle, Back, and Patapsco Neck; p. 89, Kent County; p. 92, Deer Creek; p. 93, Annapolis; pp. 94-95, Baltimore; 1774, p. 99, Elkridge; pp. 111-112, Charlestown; 1775, pp. 146-153, Baltimore; pp. 175-176, Baltimore (Man of War); 1776, pp. 184-190, Baltimore, Frederick, Hagerstown; pp. 198-208, Gunpowder Neck, Bush, Deer Creek, Elkridge, Baltimore; 1777, pp. 230-245, Baltimore, Susquehanna, Reisterstown, Annapolis, Patuxent, Deer Creek, Gunpowder, Elkridge; pp. 248-272, Annapolis, Frederick, Elkridge, Baltimore, Curtis’s Creek, Magothy River, Rocky Creek, Deer Creek, Reisterstown, Kent Island; 1778, Chestertown, Quaker Neck, Frederick; p. 294, Somerset 36 County; 1779, p. 325, Talbot County; 1780, pp. 362-365, Cecil County, Baltimore; p. 408, Baltimore; 1781, p. 423, Kent County, Baltimore; pp. 430-432, Seneca, Elkridge, Baltimore, Bush, Deer Creek; 1782, p. 434, Baltimore; p. 446, Baltimore, West River; p. 447, Calvert County; p. 450, Frederick, Perry Hall; 1783, pp. 459-460, Baltimore, Calvert; p. 465, Talbot; p. 467, Baltimore, Elkridge; 1784, p. 473, Baltimore; p. 476, Frederick, Reisterstown; pp. 482-483, Queen Anne’s, Kent Island, Cambridge, Taylor’s Island; p. 484, Snow Hill; pp. 485-486, Bohemia, Deer Creek, Baltimore, Frederick, Calvert, Abingdon, Perry Hall; 1785, pp. 496- 497, Calvert County, Annapolis, Baltimore, Abingdon, Sharpsburg; p. 498, Baltimore; pp. 500-501, Kent County, Dorset, Caroline; p. 501, Abingdon, Baltimore, Annapolis; 1786, p. 511, Baltimore, Abingdon, Antietam; p. 514, Western Maryland; p. 517, Pipe Creek, Abingdon; p. 521, Cambridge, Vienna, Wicomico, Pocomoke; p. 522, Tuckahoe; p. 523, Queen Anne’s, Baltimore; 1787, v. 2, p. 10, Abingdon, Elkton, Perry Hall, Bladensburg; p. 15, Hagerstown, Oldtown, Cumberland; pp. 17-18, Reisterstown, Baltimore, Abingdon; pp. 20-23, Eastern Shore, Cambridge, Easton, Kent Island, Tuckahoe, Queen Anne’s, Worton, Chestertown, Abingdon, Annapolis, Port Tobacco; 1788, p. 39, Baltimore, Abingdon; p. 40, Bowen’s (?), Paramore’s (?); p. 41, Annamessex, Broad Creek, Somerset County; pp. 42-43, Queenstown, Kent Island, Chestertown, Georgetown, Elkton, Abingdon, Baltimore, Annapolis, Calvert County; 1789, pp. 50-51, Montgomery County, Baltimore, Abingdon, Chestertown; pp. 57-58, Cumberland, Oldtown; pp. 59-61, Frederick, Liberty, Seneca, Baltimore, Abingdon, Bush, Havre de Grace; p. 63, Magothy Bay; pp. 64-67, Annamessex, Broad Creek, Wye, Tuckahoe, Baltimore, Annapolis, Herring Bay; 1790, p. 94, Sugar-Loaf Mountain, Baltimore, Abingdon; pp. 100-102, Annamessex, Broad Creek, Dorset, Tuckahoe, Choptank, Abingdon, Baltimore; 1791, p. 116, Baltimore, Abingdon, Cecil; pp. 137-138, Choptank, Havre de Grace, Abingdon, Bush, Deer Creek, Baltimore, Annapolis; 1792, p. 154, Cumberland; pp. 170-173, Dorset, Easton, Greensboro, Chestertown, Abingdon, Baltimore, Annapolis; 1793, p. 198, Oldtown; p. 207, Thomas White’s; pp. 208-210, Easton, Hillsborough, Church Hill, Worton’s, Abingdon, Baltimore, Annapolis, Patuxent; 1794, p. 230, Frederick, Liberty, Baltimore; pp. 244-245, Abingdon, Baltimore, Elkridge; 1795, pp. 265-268, Frederick, Liberty, Baltimore, Abingdon, North East, Chestertown, Centreville, Dorset; p. 280, Abingdon, Baltimore, Elkridge; 1796, pp. 304-306, Oldtown, Frederick, Liberty, Elkridge, Baltimore, Ahingdon, Cecil, Greenshorough, Snow Hill; p. 319, North East, Perry Hall, Baltimore; 1797, pp. 345-346, Linganore, 37 Baltimore, Perry Hall; pp. 353-354, Bohemia, North East, Perry Hall, Baltimore; 1798, pp. 377-379, Baltimore, Perry Hall, Deer Creek, North East; p. 395, North East, Perry Hall, Baltimore; 1799, pp. 412-414, Baltimore, Gunpowder, Susquehanna, Chestertown, Church Hill, Centreville, Tuckahoe, Easton, Cambridge, Vienna, Quantico, Salisbury; pp. 420-421, Woodsboro, Liberty, Frederick, Carroll’s Manor; 1800, pp. 450-451, Baltimore, Gunpowder, Abingdon, Bush; pp. 465-467, Deer Creek, Perry Hall, Baltimore, Clarksburg, Sugar-Loaf; 1801, v. 3, pp. 23-26, Pipe Creek, Baltimore, Abingdon, Bohemia, Centreville, Easton, Ennall’s Ferry, Cambridge, Choptank; pp. 29-32, North East, Perry Hall, Baltimore, Reisterstown, Pipe Creek, Sam’s Creek, Frederick; 1802, pp. 58-62, Baltimore, Perry Hall, North East, Chestertown, Easton, Ennall’s Ferry, Cambridge, Quantico, Salisbury; p. 63, Bowen’s Chapel; pp. 79-81, Charlestown, Perry Hall, Baltimore, Pipe Creek, Frederick; 1803, pp. 109-112, Baltimore, Perry Hall, Deer Creek, Bohemia, Chestertown, Easton, Cambridge, Denton; 1804, p. 153, Baltimore, Perry Hall; pp. 161-162, North East, Baltimore, Linganore; p. 163, Oldtown; p. 167, Oldtown; 1805, p. 167, Frederick, Baltimore, Perry Hall, North East; p. 188, Choptank, Easton, Centreville, Chestertown; 1806, pp. 217-219, Calvert County, Baltimore, Perry Hall, Susquehanna, Chestertown, Centreville, Easton, Cambridge; p. 231, Perry Hall, Baltimore, Elkridge; 1807, pp. 247-249, Bladensburg, Baltimore, Perry Hall, North East, Chestertown, Centreville, Easton, Cambridge, Salisbury; 1808, p. 277, Annapolis, Baltimore; pp. 279-283, Perry Hall (Gough), Baltimore, Reisterstown, Sam’s Creek, Linganore, Frederick, Hagerstown, Hancock, Oldtown, Cumberland; 1809, p. 301, Frederick, Baltimore; 1810, pp. 331-333, Baltimore, Annapolis, Calvert County, Perry Hall, Bohemia; p. 334, Snow Hill, Pocomoke City; pp. 335-336, Salisbury, Quantico, Cambridge, Easton, Chestertown; 1811, pp. 358-360, Bladensburg, Clarksburg, Hyattstown, New Market, Liberty, Linganore, Pipe Creek, Reisterstown, Baltimore, Perry Hall, Bush, North East, Elkton, Bohemia, Chestertown, Centreville, Easton, St. Michael’s, Tuckahoe; 1812, pp. 383-384, Frederick, Liberty; pp. 392-393, Manchester, Pipe Creek, Frederick, Middletown, Hagerstown, Cumberland, Oldtown; 1813, pp. 407-408, Piscataway, Patuxent, Plum Point, Calvert, Annapolis, Baltimore, Perry Hall; p. 409, Cambridge, New Market; p. 421, Pipe Creek, Frederick, Williamsport, Cumberland; 1814, p. 429, Baltimore, Perry Hall, North East; 1815, pp. 448-449, Elkridge, Baltimore, Perry Hall, Havre de Grace, Elkton, Bohemia.

See also SPRAGUE, W: B.  Annals of the American Pulpit, v. 7, pp. 13-18.

38

ASBURY, FRANCIS.  Life and times; by W. P. Strickland, 1858.

ASBURY, FRANCIS.  Life; by F. W. Briggs, 1879.

(29)

1752-1818

GARRETTSON, FREEBORN (1752-1827).  Life; by N. Bangs, 1829.  1752-1773, pp. 17-44; 1774-1776, pp. 44-45, 47-49; 1777, p. 53; 1778, pp. 62-69, 71, 78, 83; 1779, pp. 83, 85-88, 93-94, 100, 104; 1780, pp. 119-121; 1781, p. 129; 1783, p. 142; 1784, p. 149; 1792, pp. 230-233; 1809, pp. 238-249, 252-253; 1818, pp. 267-268.

See also SPRAGUE, W: B.  Annals of the American Pulpit, v. 7, pp. 54-61.

(30)

1774-76

SMYTH, J. F. D.  A tour in the United States of America. 2 vols., 1784, v. 2, pp. 110-147, 178-200, 207-223, 249-277, 313-327, 330.

See also MORRIS, J: G.  An incident in the history of the Germans in Maryland.  Society for the History of the Germans in Maryland.  Report iv, pp. 35-36.

1775

Another Tory narrative is found in CONNOLLY, J: (1750-1800?).  A narrative of the transactions, imprisonment, and sufferings of.  1889, pp. 21-24.

(30a)

Maryland Archives.  Correspondence of Council of Safety and Council of State, 1775-79, 4 vols.

1776

GUNBY, A. A.  Col. John Gunby of the Maryland line, 1902, pp. 9-38, 128-130.

(31)

1778

ANBUREY, T:  Travels through America.  2 vols., 1789, v. 2, pp. 311-314.

1779

JONES, M. M.  An exciting scene in the State Senate of Maryland, 1779.  Potter’s American Monthly, vol. iv, No. 38, February, 1875, pp. 88-90.

(32)

1782-1783

Popp Journal, 1777-1785; ed. by Rosengarten, Jos. G.  Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography, vol. xxvi, No. 102, July, 1902, pp. 251-252.

(33)

1777-81

EELKING, MAX VON.  German allied troops in the War of Independence, 1776-83.  1893.  1777, pp. 109-114; 1781, pp. 214-218.

1781

LAFAYETTE, Marquis de (1757-1834).  Memoirs, correspondence, etc., 1837, pp. 387-391, gives a view of Maryland affairs during the latter part of the Revolutionary War.

(33a)

MANDRILLON, J.  Le voyageur americain, 1782, pp. 132-142.

See also HUTCHINS, T:  Topographical description of Virginia, Pennsylvania, Maryland, and North Carolina.  London, 1778.

MORSE, JEDIDIAH.  The American geography, 1789.  Reprinted as the American universal geography in 1793.

39

1764-1775

HUTCHINS, T:  A topographical description of Virginia, Pennsylvania, Maryland, and North Carolina.  1778.

See also G. IMLAY’S “Western territory,” 1797.

GUTHRIE, W:  A new system of modern geography.  1770.

(33b)

CARROLL, C:, of Carrollton (1737-1832).  Life and correspondence; by K. M. Rowland.  2 vols., 1898.

CARROLL, C:, of Carrollton (1737-1832).  Sanderson, J:  Lives of the signers, 9 vols., 1820-27, v. 7, pp. 239-261.

See also TYSON, J.  George Washington and signers of the Declaration of Independence, 1895, v. 2, pp. 182-195.

See also JUDSON, L. C.  Signers of the Declaration of Independence, 1839, pp. 132-135.

See also BELISLE, D. W.  Signers of the Declaration of Independence, 1859, pp. 245-249.

CHASE, S: (1741-1811).  Sanderson, J:  Lives of the signers, 9 vols., 1820-27, v. 9, pp. 187-235.

See also TYSON, J.  George Washington and the signers of the Declaration of Independence, 1895, v. 2, pp. 142-158.

See also JUDSON, L. C.  Signers of the Declaration of Independence, 1839, pp. 236-248.

See also BELISLE, D. W.  Signers of the Declaration of Independence, 1859, pp. 279-281.

PACA, W: (1740-1799).  Sanderson, J:  Lives of the signers, 9 vols., 1820-27, v. 8, pp. 175-183.

See also TYSON, J.  George Washington and the signers of the Declaration of Independence, 1895, v. 2, pp. 161-169.

See also JUDSON, L. C.  Signers of the Declaration of Independence, 1839, pp. 215-218.

See also BELISLE, D. W.  Signers of the Declaration of Independence, 1859, pp. 283-285.

STONE, T: (1743-1787).  Sanderson, J:  Lives of the Signers, 9 vols., 1820-27, v. 9, pp. 153-169.

See also TYSON, J.  George Washington and the signers of the Declaration of Independence, 1895, v. 2, pp. 170-181.

See also JUDSON, L. C.  Signers of the Declaration of Independence, 1839, pp. 181-184.

See also BELISLE, D. W.  Signers of the Declaration of Independence, 1859, pp. 281-283.

TILGHMAN, TENCH (1744-1786).  Memoir; by O. Tilghman, 1876, pp. 8, 51-65.

1756-1793

TILGHMAN, W: (1756-1827).  Life; comp. by J. Golder, 1829, pp. 9-10, 13-15.

1780-1789

SMITH, Rev. W: (1727-1803).  Life and correspondence; by Horace Wemyss Smith. 2 vols., 1879-80, v. 2, pp. 34-309.

40

1801-1825

HARPER, ROBERT GOODLOE (1765-1825).  By C. W. Somerville.  The Conservative Review, v. 1, May, 1899, pp. 370-406.

See also American eloquence; by Frank Moore, 2 vols., 1881, v. 1, pp. 489-490.

1771-1817

RAMSAY, NATHANIEL (1741-1817).  Sketch of the life and character of; by W. F. Brand.  Maryland Historical Society.  Fund Publication No. 24, pp. 45-60, 1887, v. 5.

1763-1820

MARTIN, LUTHER (1744-1826).  Luther Martin: The “Federal Bulldog*#8221;; by Henry P. Goddard.  Md. Hist. Soc.  Fund Pub. No. 24, pp. 9-42, 1887, v.5.

See also American eloquence; by Frank Moore, 2 vols., 1881, v. 1, pp. 371-372.

1771-1816

MCHENRY, JAMES, M.D. (1753-1816).  Sketch of life; by Fred. J. Brown.  Md. Hist. Soc.  Fund. Pub. No. 10, v. 2, 1877.

1772-1792, 1822-1834

WIRT, W: (1772-1834).  Memoirs; by J: P. Kennedy.  2 v., 1872.

WIRT, W: (1772-1834).  Magoon, E. L.  Orators of the American Revolution, 1873, pp. 368-394.

See also American eloquence; by Frank Moore.  2 vols., 1881, v. 1, pp. 439-443.

See also WIRT, W:  Letters of the British Spy to which is prefixed a biographical sketch of the author, 1875.

PINKNEY, W: (1764-1822).  Life; by H. Wheaton in SPARKS, J., ed.  Library of American Biography, 1834, v. 6, pp. 3-84.

See also MAGOON, E. L.  Orators of the American Revolution, 1873, pp. 343-367.

1757-1823

BOZMAN, JOHN LEEDS (1757-1823).  A memoir; by S: A. Harrison.  Md. Hist. Soc.  Fund. Pub. No. 26, 1888, v. 5.

1791-1883

STANSBURY, Hon. ELIJAH (1791-1883).  Life and times; by A. Hawkins, 1874.

1764-1822

PINKNEY, WILLIAM (1764-1822).  Some account of the life, writings and speeches of; by H: Wheaton, 1826.

See also American Eloquence; by Frank Moore, 2 vols., 1881, v. 2, pp. 93-114.

1764-1822

PINKNEY, W: (1764-1822).  Life; by Rev. W: Pinkney, 1853.

TANEY, ROGER BROOKE (1777-1864).  Maury, S. M.  Statesmen in America in 1846, 1847, pp. 160-163.

TANEY, ROGER BROOKE (1777-1864).  Memoir; by S: Tyler, 1876.

41

1815-1843

(1857) PEABODY, G: (1795-1869).  Life of; by J. H. Hanaford, 1871.

See also Memorial of George Peabody.  Maryland Historical Society.  Fund Publication No. 3.

BOYLE, E.  Distinguished Marylanders, 1877.

SPRAGUE, W: B.  Annals of the American Pulpit.  9 vols.

ALLEN, E.  Clergy in Maryland of the Protestant Episcopal Church since 1783.  1860.

1760-1810

ADDISON, Rev. WALTER DULANY (1769-1848).  One hundred years ago; by E. H. Murray, 1895.

See also SPRAGUE, W: B.  Annals of the American Pulpit, v. 5, pp. 403-410.

CARROLL, Rev. JOHN (1735-1815).  Memoirs of life and times; by W. Campbell.  United States Catholic Magazine, v. iii, 1844, pp. 32-41, 98-101, 169-176, 244-246, 362-379, 662-669, 718-724, 793-802.

CARROLL, Rev. JOHN (1735-1815).  Biographical sketch; ed. by J: Carroll Brent, 1843.

PINKNEY, W:, Bishop (1810-1883).  Hutton’s life of; by H. Harrison, 1891.

See also PERRY, W. S.  Episcopate in America, 1895, p. 207.

PINKNEY, W:, Bishop (1810-1883).  Life; by O. Hutton.  1890.

WHITTINGHAM, W: R., Bishop (1805-79).  Life; by W: F. Brand.  2 vols., 1883.

See also PERRY, W: S.  Episcopate in America, 1895, p. 81.

PERRY, W: S.  Episcopate in America, 1895.

PARET, W: (1826-    ).  PERRY, W: S.  Episcopate in America, 1895, p. 289.

REUSS, F: X.  Biographical cyclopædia of the Catholic hierarchy of the United States, 1784-1898.  1898.

PERINE, G: C., ed.  Poets and verse-writers of Maryland, 1898.

1765-1803

MURRAY, W: VANS (1765-1803).  Sketch of; by C. Sulivane.  Southern Historical Association, vol. v, pp. 153-158.

(34)

1781, 1783

WASHINGTON, G:  Itinerary; ed. by W: S. Baker.  Penna. Magazine of History and Biography, v. 15, 1891, pp. 176, 186-188, 425-428.

1784-1798

WASHINGTON, G:  After the Revolution; ed. by W: S. Baker.  Penna. Magazine of History and Biography, v. 18, 1894, pp. 395, 404, 406, 416; v. 19, 1895, pp. 312, 316, 330; v. 20, 1896, pp. 69-70, 180-181, 194-195, 489-490; v. 21, 1897, pp. 21, 193-194, 276-277, 280.

42

1791

WASHINGTON, G:  Diary from 1789-1791.  1861, pp. 155-158.

(35)

1784, 1787, 1788, 1791, 1792

COKE, THOMAS.  Extracts of the journal of the Rev. Dr. Coke’s visits to America, 1793, pp. 17-23, 25-26, 45-46, 71-72, 109-112, 155-156, 162-164.

(36)

1787

SCHOEPF, J: D:  Beiträge zur mineralogischen Kenntniss des östlichen Theils von Nord-Amerika und seinen Gebirge.

1787(?)

See also BÖRSTLER, CHRISTIAN.  KENKEL, F. P.  Tagebuch von Chr. Börstler.  Deutsch-Am. G.  1902, 2.1, 56-8; 2.2, 29-32; 2.3, 49-51; 2.4, 49-56.

(37)

1788

BRISSOT DE WARVILLE, J. P.  New travels in the U. S.  2 vols., 1794, v. 1, pp. 364-367, 371-372.

See also MAVOR’s Voyages and Travels, v. 19, pp. 304-310.

See also orig. ed. Nouveau voyage dans les Etats-Unis, 1791, v. 2, pp. 255-264, 271-306.

(38)

1791

BAYARD, F. M.  Voyage dans l’interieur des Etats-Unis, 1798, pp. 1-71, 301-303, 307-309.

See Steiner’s Frenchman in Maryland, in Sewanee Review for Jan., 1904.

(39)

1791

CHATEAUBRIAND, F. A. de.  Travels in America and Italy. 2 vols., 1828, v. 1, pp. 95-96.

See CHATEAUBRIAND, F. A. de.  Œuvres Complètes, 36 vols., Paris, 1838, v. 12.  Voyage en Amerique.

(40)

1793

COOPER, T:, comp.  Information respecting America, 1795, pp. 92-93.

1792

COALE, ISAAC, jr.  The Columbus monument of Baltimore.  Dixie, vol. i, April, 1899, pp. 395-397.

(41)

1793

PRIEST, W:  Travels in the U. S., 1802, pp. 14-21, 76-83.

(42)

1793-?

HARRIOTT, J:  Struggles through life, 2 vols., 1808, v. 2, pp. 10-11, 83-87, 251-255, 262.

(43)

1795

TWINING, T:  Travels in America 100 years ago, 1894, pp. 71-126.
Also Travels in India, pp. 347-449.

(44)

1796

WELD, I:, JR.  Travels through the States of North America, 2 vols., 1800, v. 1, pp. 36-48, 96-103, 132-141, 245-246.

See also MAVOR’S Voyages and Travels, v. 25, pp. 13-16, 26-29, 52-54.

1796

See also BAILY, FRANCIS.  Journal of a tour in unsettled parts of North America in 1796 and 1797.  1856, pp. 103-106, 107-110, 129-134.

BAILY, FRANCIS.  Journal.  See also HULBERT, ARCHER B.  Historic highways of America: Pioneer roads and experiences of travellers.  (Vol. 1.)  1904, pp. 107-129.

43

(45)

1796

COKE, T:  Journal of Dr. Coke’s sixth tour on the Continent of America and his last tour through Ireland.  Wesleyan Methodist Magazine, vol. 25, pp. 316-319, 395-399, 501.

See also SPRAGUE, W: B.  Annals of the American Pulpit, v. 7, pp. 130-139.

(46)

1796

LA ROCHEFOUCAULT-LIANCOURT, F. A. F., Duc De.  Travels in North America, 4 vols., 1800, v. 3, pp. 240-262, 543-612, 698-710.

Original ed.  Voyage dans les Etats-Unis d’Amérique sait en 1795, 96 et 97, 8 vols., Paris, 1799.

(47)

1798-99

BERNARD, J:  Retrospections of America, 1887, pp. 84-85, 123-145, 171-174.

(48)

1798-1800

PARKINSON, R:  Tour in America in 1798, 1799, and 1800.  1805, pp. 63-81, 159-229.

(49)

1798-1802

DAVIS, J:  Travels in the United States of America, 1803, pp. 310-311, 327-335, 394-400.

1801

See also BUHLE, M.  Reisen durch die vereinigten Staaten von Amerika, 1808, pp. 107-110, 112-113.

(50)

1805

RIPLEY, D.  The bank of faith and works united, 1822, pp. 222-232, 238-239.

(51)

1805-1806

SUTCLIFF, R.  Travels in some parts of North America, 1815, pp. 58, 65-66, 74-76, 106-107, 115-116, 202-207, 210-216.

See also BONAPARTE, E. (PATTERSON), Mme. (1785-1879).  By E. L. Didier.

BONAPARTE, E. (PATTERSON), Mme. (1785-1879).  Bonaparte-Patterson marriage: secret correspondence; ed. by W. T. R. Saffell, 1873.

1803

RILEY, ELIHU S.  An historical Baltimore romance.  Dixie, vol. ii, Nov., 1899, pp. 498-512.

(51a)

1731-1806

BANNEKER, B:  Banneker, the Afric-American astronomer; by M. E. Tyson, 1884.

(51b)

1748-1805

MASON, SUSANNA.  Selections from her letters and manuscripts, 1836.

(52)

1806-07

MELISH, J:  Travels through the United States; 1818, pp. 137-144, 285-286.

See also PINKERTON, J:, comp.  Discoveries and settlements made by the English in America.  v. 12, pp. 305-309.

1807

SCOTT, JOSEPH.  Geographical description of the states of Maryland and Delaware, 1807, pp. 1-155.

CONDER, J.  Modern traveller, 33 vols., 1830-31, v. 23, pp. 120-123; v. 24, pp. 62-74.

1807

STEINER, BERNARD C.  An interesting criminal case.  The Green Bag, v. 16, March, 1904, pp. 172-174.

(53)

1810

JOYNES, T: R.  Memoranda made by T: R. Joynes on a journey to the States of Ohio and Kentucky, 1810.

44

William and Mary College Quarterly, vol. x, No. 4, April, 1902, pp. 231-232.

(54)

1812

MASON, D. G.  How young Lowell Mason travelled to Savannah.  New England Magazine, vol. xxvi, No. 2, p. 238.

(55)

1814

SMITH, Sir HARRY.  Autobiography of, 2 vols., 1901, v. 1, pp. 196-208.

1814

PAULDING, JAMES K.  Lay of the Scottish fiddle. 1814.  (Curious satire on the burning of Havre de Grace.)

(56)

1814

GLEIG, G. R.  Campaigns of the British Army.  1879, pp. 46-112.
See also Edition of 1821, pp. 83-206.

See also KING, H.  Battle of Bladensburg.  Magazine of American History, v. xiv, pp. 438-457.

1812-1814

BLANCHARD, AMY E.  A Heroine of 1812.  (Baltimore.)  [A novel.]

1812-1814

THRUSTON, Lucy M.  Jack and his island, 1902.  [A novel.]

(57)

1813-14

WILLIAMS, J: S.  History of the invasion and capture of Washington, 1857.

(57a)

1814-1840

HAWKINS, J: H. W. (1797-1858).  Life of; by W: G: Hawkins, 1859, pp. 11-14, 19-20, 23-24, 39-42, 57, 59-65, 69-72, 317-318.

(58)

1816

HALL, F.  Travels in Canada and the United States, 1818, pp. 321-323.
Traveler’s directory through the United States. 1815.

(59)

1817

BIRKBECK, M.  Notes on a journey in America from the coast of Virginia to the Territory of Illinois, 1818, pp. 29-30.

(60)

1817

PALMER, J:  Journal of travels in the U. S. of N. A. and in Lower Canada, 1818, pp. 24-30, 37-40, 157-159.

1817

See also HALL, FRANCIS.  Travels in Canada and the United States in 1816 and 1817.  1818, pp. 321-323.  Reviewed in The Annual Register for the year 1819.  1820, pp. 525-526.

(61)

1818

DUNCAN, J: M.  Travels through part of the U. S. and Canada, in 1818 and 1819. 2 vols., 1823, v. 1, pp. 219-247.

1818

LOGAN, J:  The western woodpecker, being the journal of a journey performed in the months of February, March, and April, 1818.  1818.

(62)

1819

HOWITT, E.  Letters from the United States in 1819.  1820, pp. 74-76.

1819

See also Series of letters and other documents relating to the late Epidemic of Yellow Fever, 1820.

REESE, D: M., M.D.  Observations of the Epidemic of 1819, as it prevailed in a part of the city of Baltimore, 1819.

45

(63)

1819-20

FAUX, W.  Memorable days in America, 1823, pp. 98-99, 138-146, 161-165, 345.

WARDEN, D. B.  A statistical political and historical account of the United States of North America, from the period of their first colonization to the present day.  3 vols., 1819, vol. 2, pp. 137-165, Maryland.

(64)

1819-20

HODGSON, A.  Letters from North America, 2 vols., 1824, v. 1, pp. 325-328; v. 2, pp. 89-91, 97-98.

(65)

1819-1823, 1826

SPARKS, JARED.  Life and writings; by H. B. Adams, 2 vols., 1893, v. 1, pp. 135-217, 415, 464-469.

1825

SPARKS, JARED.  Baltimore.  North American Review, v. xx, 1825, pp. 99-138.

See also SPARKS, JARED.  Life and writings; by H. B. Adams, 2 vols., 1893, v. 1, pp. 259-261.

(66)

1820

DARUSMONT, F. (W.).  Society in America, 1822, pp. 438-458.

(67)

1823

BELTRAMI, J. C.  A pilgrimage in Europe and America, 2 vols., 1828, v. 2, pp. 46-59.

1822?

WOODS, J:  Two years’ residence in the settlement on the English prairie in the Illinois country of the United States, 1822.  (Baltimore.)

(68)

1824

ROYALL, Mrs. A.  Sketches of history, life, and manners in the United States, 1826, pp. 183-202.

(69)

1824

COOPER, J. FENIMORE.  Notions of the Americans, 2 vols., 1828, v. 1, pp. 307-310; v. 2, pp. 3-7.

1824-1825

See also PICKERING, JOSEPH.  Inquiries of an emigrant: Being the narrative of an English farmer from the year 1824-1830.  1832, pp. 18-45.

(70)

1824

DUDEN, GOTTFRIED.  Bericht über eine Reise nach dem westlichen Staaten Nordamerika’s, 1829, pp. 16-33.

1824

See also N., S. v.  Mein Besuch Amerika’s im Sommer 1824.  1827, pp. 35-52, 58.

(71)

1824-25

LEVASSEUR, A.  Lafayette en Améique en 1824 et 1825, ou Journal d’un voyage aux Etats-Unis, 2 vols., 1829, v. 1, pp. 332-384; v. 2, pp. 1-3, 33-35, 573-574.

See also LAFAYETTE, Marquis de.  Complete history, 1845, pp. 464-471.

(72)

1824-1840

ADAMS, J: QUINCY.  Memoirs, comprising portions of his diary from 1795-1848.  Ed. by C: F. Adams, 12 vols., 1874-77, v. 6, pp. 424-426; v. 7, pp. 333-339; v. 8, p. 76; v. 9, pp. 345-347; v. 10, pp. 362-365.

(73)

1825

BERNHARD, K., Duke of Sore Weimar.  Travels through North America, 1828, Pt. 1, pp. 161-169, 184-185.

(74)

1827

HALL, Capt. BASIL.  Travels in North America, 3 vols., 1829, v. 2, pp. 391-404.

46

1827-1831

KENNEDY, J: P.  At home and abroad, 1872, pp. 167-229.  (Baltimore long ago.)
See also MCMASTER, J: B., p. 83.

(75)

1827-1828

ROYALL, Mrs. A.  The black book, 2 vols., 1828, v. 1, pp. 100-106, 272-315.

1828

ROYALL, Mrs. A.  Pennsylvania, or travels continued in the United States, 2 vols., 1829, v. 1, pp. 4-31.

(76)

1829-30

STUART, JAMES.  Three years in North America, 2 vols., 1833, v. 1, pp. 384-388, 393; v. 2, pp. 4-6.

MACKENZIE, W: L.  Sketches of Canada and of the United States, 1833, pp. 23-25.  (Baltimore—Indian Queen Hotel; Slaves and free blacks.)

(77)

1830

BOARDMAN, JAMES.  America and the Americans, 1833, pp. 217-220, 257-265.

(78)

1830

FERRALL, S. A.  A ramble of six thousand miles through the United States of America, 1832, pp. 304-307.

(79)

1830

TROLLOPE, F.  Domestic manners of the Americans, 1839, pp. 156-168, 202-209, 232-238.

(79a)

1800-34

TOWNSEND, G: A.  The entailed hat; or Patty Cannon’s times.  (Eastern Shore of Maryland.)

1832

HUNGERFORD, JAMES.  The Old Plantation.  (Along the western shore of the Chesapeake and Southern Maryland.)

TOWNSEND, G: A.  Tales of the Chesapeake.

GOLDSBOROUGH, E. K., M.D.  Ole Mars’ an’ Ole Miss.  (Eastern Shore.  Negroes before the War.)

1780-1853

WALLACE, ADAM.  The parson of the Islands: A biography of Joshua Thomas, 1861.  (Tangier Islands.)

(79b)

1830-31

HAMILTON, T:  Men and manners in America, 2 vols., 1833, v. 2, pp. 6-13, 81-86.

183-

See also Sketches of Martha’s Vineyard and other reminiscences of travel at home, etc., 1838, pp. 91-97.

(80)

1831

ALEXANDER, Sir J. E.  Transatlantic sketches, 2 vols., 1833, v. 2, pp. 256-260.

1833

VARLE, C:  Complete view of Baltimore, 1833.

1831

See also LUCAS, FIELDING, jr., pub.  Picture of Baltimore, 1832.  Supposed to have been written by J. H. B. Latrobe.

(80a)

1831

HAMILTON, T:  Men and manners in America, 2 vols., 1833, vol. 2, pp. 7-13, 81-85.

(81)

1831-32

TUDOR, H:  Tour in North America, 2 vols., 1834, v. 1, pp. 48-57, 72-84, 445-446; v. 2, pp. 442-443.

(82)

1832

Penn. magazine of history and biography, July, 1901, vol. xxv, p. 284.

47

(83)

1832

COKE, E. T.  A subaltern’s furlough, 1833, pp. 72-86, 115-120, 130-136.

See also HULBERT, ARCHER B.  Historic highways of America: The great American canals, 2 v., 1904, (Vol. i), pp. 33-168.

(84)

1832-34

ARFWEDSON, C. D.  The United States and Canada in 1832, 1833, and 1834.  2 vols., 1834, v. 1, pp. 294-309; v. 2, pp. 144-148.

(85)

1832-33

LATROBE, C: J.  The rambler in North America, 2 vols., 1835, v. 1, pp. 28-37; v. 2, pp. 3-4.

(86)

1833

FINCH, I.  Travels in the United States of America and Canada.  (Fort Washington and St. Mary’s.)

(87)

1833-34

POWER, T.  Impressions of America, 2 vols., 1836, v. 1, pp. 135-142, 197-199, 225-239; v. 2, pp. 45-72.

(88)

1834

ABDY, E. S.  Journal of a residence and tour in the United States, 3 vols., 1835, v. 2, pp. 53-57.

(89)

1834

FEATHERSTONHAUGH, G. W.  Excursion through the slave states, 2 vols., 1844, v. 1, pp. 1-11.

(90)

1834

REED, A., and MATHESON, J.  Narrative of the visit to the American churches, 2 vols., 1835, v. 2, pp. 299-306.

(91)

1834-35

CHEVALIER, MICHAEL.  Society, manners, and politics in the United States, 1839, pp. 240-241, 263-264, 392-394.

(92)

1835

MARTINEAU, HARRIET.  Society in America, 3 vols., 1837, v. 3, p. 167.

MARTINEAU, HARRIET.  Retrospect of western travel, 2 vols., 1838, v. 1, pp. 140-142.

For sketches of prominent Maryland women of this period see:

1819-1838

WELBY, AMELIA B. COPPUCK (1819-1852).  Women of the South; by Mary Forrest, 1861, pp. 386-389.

1841-

PHELPS, ALMIRA LINCOLN (1793-1884).  Women of the South; by Mary Forrest, 1861, pp. 184-194.

(92a)

1835

COX, F. A., and HOBY, J.  The Baptists in America, 1836, pp. 24-27.

(93)

1835-36

GRUND, F. J., ed.  Aristocracy in America, 2 vols., 1839, v. 2, pp. 174-182.

(94)

1836

LOGAN, J.  Notes of a journey through Canada, the United States of America, and the West Indies, 1838, p. 151.

(95)

1836

GILMAN, CAROLINE.  The poetry of travelling in the United States, 1838, pp. 24-29, 367-368.

See also LENZ, T. W.  Reise nach St. Louis am Mississippi, 1838, pp. 15-21.

DISTURNELL, J:  A guide between New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, and Washington, 1837.

TANNER.  The American traveller, or guide to the States, 1837.

48

(96)

1838

BUCKINGHAM, J. S.  America, 3 vols., n. d., v. 1, pp. 269-270, 385-474.

1839

BUCKINGHAM, J. S.  The slave states of America, 2 vols. (1842), v. 2, pp. 573-575.

1840

BUCKINGHAM, J. S.  Eastern and western states, 3 vols., 1842, v. 2, pp. 96-142, 149-158.

(97)

1839

COMBE, G:  Notes on the United States of North America, during a phrenological visit in 1838-9-40, 2 vols., 1841, v. 1, pp. 263-264, 281.

(98)

1838?-1844

WAYLEN, E:  Ecclesiastical reminiscences of the U. S., 1846, pp. 202, 207-239, 437-454.

(98a)

1840

WILLS, W: H.  Journal of travels from Tarboro to the Southern Country in the spring of 1840.  Southern History Association, vol. vii, No. 5, Sept., 1903, pp. 350-352.

WILLS, W: H.  A Southern traveler’s diary in 1840.  Southern History Association, vol. vii, No. 6, Nov., 1903, pp. 427-429.

(99)

1840

MAXWELL, A. M.  A run through the United States during the autumn of 1840, 2 vols., 1841, v. 2, pp. 172-180.

(100)

1840

GRATTAN, T: C.  Civilized America, 2 vols., 1859, v. 1, pp. 161-163; v. 2, pp. 222-226.

(100a)

WILLIS, N. P.  American scenery, 2 vols., 1840, v. 1, pp. 78-79, 82-84; v. 2, pp. 51-53, 91-93.

See also LYFORD, W: G.  Maryland, and its resources.  Merchant’s Magazine, vol. v, July, 1841, pp. 50-57.

(101)

1841

GURNEY, J. J:  Journey in North America, 1841, pp. 85-88, 248-251, 257, 406.

(102)

1841

STURGE, J.  Visit to the United States in 1841.  1842, pp. 29-37.  Appendix D, x-xxxi.  Elisha Tyson, from his life.

(103)

1841-42

LYELL, C:  Travels in North America in 1841-42.  1845, v. 1, p. 102; v. 2, pp. 5-19.

(104)

1842

DICKENS, C:  American notes, etc., 1893, pp. 97-100, 119-121.

(105)

1842

GODLEY, J: R.  Letters from America, 2 vols., 1844, v. 2, pp. 170-187.

WAGNER, P. W. G.  Wanderungen eines heimathlosen in Nord Amerika, 1844.

(106)

1844

TAYLOR, BAYARD.  At home and abroad, 2 vols., 1883, v. 1, pp. 17-21.

(107)

1845-

HOUSTON, Mrs. M. J.  Hesperos, 2 vols., 1850, v. 1, pp. 214-229, 236-249.

(108)

1846

From Sydney to Southampton, 1851, pp. 292-306.

(109)

1846

MACKAY, ALEXANDER.  The western world, 3 vols., 1850, v. 1, pp. 159-162.

49

(110)

1846-56

LANMAN, C:  Adventures in the wilds of the United States, etc., 2 vols., 1856, v. 1, pp. 505-514; v. 2, pp. 245-255.

(111)

1847

DAVIES, E.  American scenes and Christian slavery, 1849, pp. 186-203.

(112)

1847-48

GOODRICH, C. A.  A visit to the principal cities of the western continent, 1848, pp. 338-348.

(113)

1848

DIXON, J.  Personal narrative of a tour through a part of the United States and Canada, 1849, pp. 52-54, 69-79.

(114)

1848

LOSSNG, BENSON J.  Pictorial field-book of the Revolution, 2 vols., 1860, v. 2, pp. 181-199.

(115)

1849

BAIRD, R.  Impressions and experiences of the West Indies and North America in 1849.  1850, pp. 278-280.

(116)

1849

WORTLEY, Lady E. S.  Travels in the United States, 1855, pp. 78-82.

LEWIS, J: D.  Across the Atlantic, 1851.

(117)

1850

CUNYNGHAME, A.  A glimpse at the great western republic, 1851, pp. 287-292.

HUGHES, JEREMIAH.  Brief sketch of Maryland, its geography, boundaries, etc., 1845.

1850

See also KENNEDY, Jos. C. G.  History and statistics of the state of Md. according to the return of the 7th census of the U. S., 1850.  1852.

1852

FISHER, R. S., M.D. Gazetteer of the state of Maryland; compiled from returns of the 7th census of the U. S., 1852.

(118)

1851?

MACKINNON, L. B.  Atlantic and transatlantic sketches, 2 vols., 1852, v. 1, pp. 86-92.

(119)

1851-52

PULSZKY, F. and T.  White, red, black, 2 vols., 1853, v. 1, pp, 170-172, 247-254.

(120)

1852?

HENGISTON, J. W.  Something of Baltimore, Washington, the Chesapeake, and Potomac.  Colburn’s New Monthly Magazine, vol. 97, pp. 358-366.

(121)

1852

FINCH, M.  An Englishwoman’s experience in America, 1853, pp. 267-271.

(122)

1853?

BOWEN, ELE.  Rambles in the path of the steamhorse, 1855, pp. 28-177, 193-196, 238-316.

(123)

1853

CHAMBERS, W:  Things as they are in America, 1857, pp. 253-257.

(124)

1853

MURRAY, H: A.  Lands of the slave and the free, 1857, pp. 198-201.

1853

THACKERAY, W: MAKEPEACE (1811-63).  Letters, 1847-55.  1887, pp. 165-167.  Baltimore.

(125)

1853

OLMSTED, F: L.  A journey in the seaboard slave states. 1856, pp. 5-11.

50

(126)

1853

BUNN, A.  Old England and New England, 1853, pp. 105-108.

(126a)

1795-1870

KENNEDY, J: P. (1795-1870).  Life; by H: T. Tuckerman, 1871.

Tiernan family.  The Tiernan family in Maryland; by C: B. Tiernan, 1898.

1801-1890

HEWITT, J: H. (1801-90).  Shadows on the wall, 1877.

1803-1891

LATRORE, J: H. B. (1803-1891).  Proceedings of the Md. Hist. Soc.  In commemoration of the late Hon. John H. B. Latrobe, for twenty years president of the Society.

1817-1838

DOUGLASS, FREDERICK (1817-1895).  My bondage and freedom, 1855.

DOUGLASS, FREDERICK (1817-1895).  Life and times, with introduction; by G. L. Ruffin, 1892.

1853

POTTER, R: J. (Colored).  A narrative of the experiences, adventures, and escape of, from Denton, Caroline Co., 1866.

(127)

1854

SHAW, J:  A ramble through the United States, Canada, and the West Indies, 1856, pp. 131-133.

(128)

1854

WELD, C: R:  Vacation tour in the United States and Canada, 1855, pp. 242-254, 331-337.

(129)

1854

EVEREST, R.  A journey through the United States and part of Canada, 1855, pp. 76, 80.

See also FISHER, R. S.  Progress of the United States from the earliest period.  New York, 1854.

(130)

FERGUSON, W:  America by river and rail, 1856, pp. 98-99, 495-500.

(131)

MAYER, BRANTZ.  A June jaunt; with some wanderings in the foot-steps of Washington, Braddock, and the early pioneers.  Harper’s New Monthly Magazine, vol. xiv, No. 83, April, 1857, pp. 592-612.

(132)

1856

MÜLLER, J: W., von.  Reisen in den Vereinigten Staaten, Canada, und Mexico, 3 vols., 1864, v. 1, pp. 93-94.

(133)

1856

PAIRPOINT, A.  Uncle Sam and his country, 1857, pp. 219-224.

(134)

1856

OLMSTED, F: L.  A journey through Texas, 1857, pp. 1-4.

(135)

1858

MACKAY, C:  Life and liberty in America, 1859, pp. 119-121, 270-279.

(136)

1858

STROTHER, D. H.  Artists’ excursion over the Baltimore and Ohio R. R. Harper’s New Monthly Magazine, vol. xix, No. 109, June, 1859, pp. 1-19.

51

(137)

GOBRIGHT, J: C.  The Monumental City, 1858.

GOBRIGHT, J: C.  City rambles, or Baltimore as it is, 1857.

Stranger’s guide to Baltimore, by a Baltimorean, 1852.

(138)

1860

CORNWALLIS, K.  Royalty in the New World, 1860, pp. 183-196.

(139)

1860

WOODS, N. A.  Prince of Wales in Canada and the United States, 1869, pp. 364-365.

(140)

1861

LOSSING, BENSON J.  Pictorial field-hook of the War of 1812, 1869, pp. 673-674, 961-965.

(141)

1861

Baltimore, conflict between U. S. troops and mob in, Apr. 19, 1861.  War of the Rebellion: Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, series 1, vol. 2, chap. ix, pp. 7-21.  Communications in same volume.

Baltimore and the Mass. Sixth, Apr. 19.  Rebellion Records.  F. Moore, ed., vol. 1, pp. 33-34, and Doc. 69, pp. 78-79.

BOOTH, G. W.  Personal reminiscences of a Maryland soldier in the war between the states, 1861-1865.  1898, pp. 6-8.

BROWN, G: W:  Baltimore and the 19th of April, 1861.  1897.

CRAFTS, W. A.  The Southern Rebellion, 2 vols., 1862, vol. 1, pp. 130, 178-181.

HANSON, JOHN W.  Historical sketch of the Old Sixth Regiment, 1866, pp. 23-44.

HARRIS, J. MORRISON.  A reminiscence of the troublous times of Apr., 1861.  Maryland Historical Society, Fund Publication, No. 31, 1891.

HEDRICK, M. A.  Incidents of the Civil War, 1888, pp. 38-44, 59, 79.

KING, W. E., and DERBY, W. P.  Camp-fire sketches and battlefield echoes, 1887, pp. 16-18.

POLLARD, E: A.  Southern history of the War, 4 vols., 1862-66, v. 1, pp. 63-64.

ROBINSON, J: C.  Baltimore in 1861.  Magazine of American History, vol. xiv, pp. 257-268.

TENNEY, W. J.  Military and Naval History of the Rebellion in the U. S., 1886, pp. 30-31.

TOMES, R., and SMITH, B: G.  The war with the South, 3 vols., 1862, v. 1, pp. 186-193.

WATSON, B; F.  Addresses, reviews, and episodes chiefly concerning the Old Sixth" Mass. Regiment, 1901, pp. 24-47.

WATSON, B. F.  “Old Sixth” Massachusetts, 1886, pp. 24-45.

52

(142)

1861

HICKS, T: H. (1798-1865).  Gov. Hicks of Maryland and the Civil War; by G: L. P. Radcliffe.  Johns Hopkins University Studies, series xix, Nos. 11-12, pp. 504-635.

1861-1862

Union Policy of Repression in Maryland, April 20, 1861 - Nov. 29, 1862.  War of the Rebellion: Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, series ii, vol. i, pp. 563-748.

Baltimore.  Arrest of G: P. Kane, Chief of Police, June, 1861.  Rebellion Record; F. Moore, ed., vol. 2, pp. 8-9; Doc. 48, p. 176.

Maryland Legislature, arrest of members of, and of other citizens of the State, Sept. 12-17, 1861.  War of the Rebellion: Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, series i; vol. v, chap. xiv, pp. 193-197.

Arrest of members of the Legislature, Sept. 17, 1861.  Rebellion Record; F. Moore, ed., vol. 3, p. 30.

BAKER, L. C.  The United States secret service, 1890.

CRAFTS, W. A.  Southern Rebellion, 2 v., 1862, v. 1, pp. 182-188, 221-223.

HARDINGE, B. (B.).  Belle Boyd in camp and prison, 1867, pp. 99-100.

Arrest of members of Legislature.  McCLELLAN, G: B.  McClellan’s own story, 1887, pp. 146-148.

Confederate arrests.  POLLARD, E: A.  Southern history of the War, v. 1, pp. 68-69.

TODD, W.  Seventy-ninth Highlanders, 1886, p. 7.

Capture of the “French Lady,” July 8, 1861.  Rebellion Record; F. Moore, ed., v. 2, Doc. 74, pp. 255-256.

(142a)

1861-1865

GOLDSBOROUGH, W. W.  The Maryland Line in the Confederate States Army, 1869.

1861-1865

Maryland; by Bradley T. Johnson.  Confederate Military History, 12 v., 1899, vol. 2.

1862, 1863, 1864

Southern Generals, who they are and what they have done, 1865, pp. 75-77, 98-109, 187-188, 303, 351-352, 365, 371, 380, 382, 387.

GILL, J:  Reminiscences of four years of a private soldier in the Confederate Army, 1904.

1861-62

JOHNSON, B. T.  The Maryland Line in the Confederate Army.  Southern Historical Society Papers, v. xi, 1883, pp. 21-26.

1861-62

JOHNSON, BRADLEY T.  Memoir of the First Maryland Regiment.  Southern Historical Society Papers, v. ix, pp. 344-353, 481-488 v. x, pp. 46-56, 97-109, 145-153, 214-223.

1861

RITTER, W. L.  Sketch of the third battery of Maryland artillery.  Southern Historical Society Papers, v. x, pp. 328-332, 392-401, 464-471.

53

(142b)

1861

Gen. Butler at the Relay, May, 1861.  Rebellion Record; F. Moore, ed., v. 1, Doc. 146, pp. 208-209.

Gen. Butler in Baltimore, May, 1861.  Rebellion Record; F. Moore, ed., vol. 1, Doc. 165, pp. 243-244.

Gen. Butler at the Relay and in Baltimore.  BUTLER, B: F.  Butler’s book (Eighth Mass. Regiment), pp. 225-243.

Gen. Butler at the Relay.  PARTON, JAMES.  Gen. Butler in New Orleans, pp. 100-119.

(143)

1861

Annapolis, Department of.  War of the Rebellion: Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, series i, v. li, Pt. i, chap. lxiii, p. 405.

BENNETT, EDWIN C.  Musket and sword, or the camp, march, and firing line in the Army of the Potomac, 1900, p. 6.

BURLINGAME, J: K.  History of the 5th Regiment of Rhode Island heavy artillery, 1892, pp. 7-10.

BUTLER, B: F. (1818-93).  Butler’s book, 1892, pp. 188-216.

ELDREDGE, D.  The 3rd New Hampshire and all about it, 1893, pp. 36-44.

EMMERTON, JAMES A.  Record of the 23d Regiment Mass. Vol. Infantry in the War of the Rebellion, 1861-1865.  1886, pp. 19-28.

NICHOLS, J. M:  Perry’s saints (48th Reg. N. Y.), 1886, pp. 41-47.

PALMER, ABRAHAM J.  History of the 48th Regiment, N. Y. State Vols., 1861-1865.  1885, pp. 11-13.

PARTON, JAMES.  General Butler in New Orleans, 1863, pp. 75-100.

(144)

1860-62

JONES, S. L.  Life in the South, 2 vols., 1863, v. 1, pp. 16-21, 114-l18; v. 2, pp. 389-392.

(145)

1861-62

TROLLOPE, ANTHONY.  North America, 2 vols., 1862, v. 1, pp. 452-467; v. 2, pp. 227-231.
See also North America, 1864, pp. 290-300, 446-449.

(146)

1861

RUSSELL, W: H.  My diary North and South, 1863, pp. 36-37, 140-141, 157-158, 181-185, 208-209.

(147)

1861-

DAWES, R. R.  Sixth Wisconsin Volunteers, 1890, pp. 16-19.

(148)

1861-

CAMPER, C:, and KIRKLEY, J. W.  Historical record of the 1st Regiment Maryland Infantry, 1871, pp. 6-22, 24.

Operations on the Upper Potomac River (Union).  War of the Rebellion: Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, series i, vol. li, Pt. i, chap. lxiii.

Operations on the Upper Potomac (Confederate), series i, vol. li, Pt. ii.

54

Operations along the Potomac, July-Oct.  Confederate Military History, v. 3, pp. 178-186.

B. & O. R. R. and Baltimore in summer of ’61.  HEDRICK, M. A.  Incidents of the Civil War, pp. 68-69, 79.

(149)

1861

Operations in Maryland, Apr. 16 to July 31, 1861.  War of the Rebellion: Records of the Union and Conferedate Armies, series i, vol. ii, chap. ix, pp. 577-770.

FAIRCHILD, C. B., comp.  History of the 27th Regiment N. Y. Vols., 1888, p. 7.

HATFIELD, S. P.  First Connecticut Artillery, 1893, pp. 12-13.

HILL, A. F.  Our boys (8th Penna. Reserves), 1864, pp. 48-52.

MILLS, J: HARRISON.  Chronicles of the 21st Regiment N. Y. S. Vols., 1887, pp. 73-75.

MINNIGH, H. N.  History of Company K, 1st (Inft.) Penna. Reserves, 1891, pp. 8-9.

TOMES, R., and SMITH, B: G.  War with the South, vol. 1, pp. 198-229.

TROBRIAND, REGIS DE.  Four years with the Army of the Potomac, pp. 57-58, 75-76.

WILSON, W: B.  A few acts and actors in the Civil War, 1892, pp. 27-32.

WOODWARD, E. M.  History of the 3rd Penna. Reserves, 1883, p. 30.

(150)

1861

Rockville Expedition, June 10-July 7, 1861.  War of the Rebellion: Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, series i, vol. ii, chap. ix, pp. 104-123.

ABBOTT, STEPHEN G.  The 1st Regiment New Hampshire Volunteers in the Great Rebellion, 1890, pp. 120-123, 129-139, 144-163.

1861-1862

QUINT, A.  The Potomac and the Rapidan (2nd Mass.), 1864, pp. 9-62.

(151)

1861

WOODBURY, AUGUSTUS.  Narrative of the campaign of the 1st Rhode Island Regiment, 1862, pp. 15-24, 59, 61, 65.

(152)

1861

GOULD, J: M.  History of the First, Tenth, Twenty-ninth Maine Regiment, 1871, pp. 35-36, 63, 88-107.

HYDE, T: W.  Following the Greek cross, or memories of the 6th Army Corps, 1894, pp. 20-28.

(153)

1861

Point of Rocks, Skirmish at, Sept. 24, 1861.  War of the Rebellion: Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, series i, vol. v, chap. xiv, pp. 214-215.  Skirmish, Dec. 19, 1861, pp. 472-473.

Point of Rocks, Skirmish near, Aug., 1861.  Rebellion Records; F. Moore, ed., vol 2, pp. 56-57; Doc. 164, p. 481.

55

Edward’s Ferry, Skirmish near, Oct. 4, 1861.  War of the Rebellion: Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, series i, vol. v, chap. xiv, pp. 237-238.

Budd’s Ferry, Affairs around, Oct. 22, 1861.  War of the Rebellion: Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, series i, vol. v, chap. xiv, pp. 372-377, 384-385.

Budd’s Ferry.  CUDWORTH, W. H.  History of the 1st Reg. Mass. Infantry, 1866, pp. 96-135.

Mattawoman Creek, Affairs at the mouth of, Nov. 14, 1861.  War of the Rebellion: Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, series i, vol. v, chap. xiv, pp. 421-424.

Lower Potomac, Fight on, Dec. 9, 1861.  Rebellion Record; F. Moore, ed., vol. 3; Doc. 218, pp. 459-460.

A voyage down the Potomac, Aug. 30, 1861.  Rebellion Record; F. Moore, ed., vol. 3; Doc. 28, pp. 62-64.

(154)

1861

Lower Maryland, Expedition into, Nov. 3-11, 1861.  War of the Rebellion: Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, series i, vol. v, chap. xiv, pp. 385-388, 640-649.

ALLEN, G: H.  Forty-six months with the 4th Rhode Island, 1887, pp. 29-35.

CHILD, W:  History of the 5th Regiment N. H. Vols., 1893, pp. 20, 24-28.

COLES, G: W.  History of the 11th Penna. Vol. Cavalry, 1902, pp. 16-18, 20-21.

CUDWORTH, W. H.  History of the 1st Mass. Infantry, 1866, pp. 74-95.

(155)

1861

Eastern Shore, Affairs in, generally.  War of the Rebellion: Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, series i, vol. v, chap. xiv, pp. 581, 609-641.

DAVENPORT, A.  Camp and field life of the Fifth New York Vol. Infantry, p. 126.

(156)

1861

PROWELL, G: R.  History of the 87th Regiment Penna. Vols., 1901, pp. 13-25.

(157)

1861-1862

DAVENPORT, ALFRED.  Camp and field life of the 5th New York Vol. Infantry, 1879, pp. 91-153.

EDDY, RICHARD.  History of the 60th Regiment N. Y. S. Vols., 1864, pp. 46-100.

WALCOTT, C: F.  History of the 21st Regiment Mass. Vols., 1882, pp. 7-19.

(158)

1862

PELLET, ELIAS P.  History of the 114th Regiment N. Y. S. Vols., 1866, pp. 15-21.

BEECHER, HARRIS H.  Record of the 114th Regiment N. Y. S. Volunteers, 1866, pp. 59-78.

(159)

1861-

LOCKE, W: H:  Story of the Regiment (11th Penna. Vols.), 1868, pp. 16-22.

56

(160)

1861-1862

ALLEN, G: H.  Forty-six months with the 4th Rhode Island, 1887, pp. 42-45.

BOUDRYE, L: N.  Historic records of the 5th New York Cavalry, 1865, pp. 21-24.

CADWELL, C: K.  The Old Sixth Regiment (Conn. Vol. Infantry), p. 21.

LOCKE, W: H:  Story of the regiment (11th Penna. Vols.), pp. 42-56.

PARKER, T: H.  History of the 51st Regiment of Penna. Vols. and Vet. Vols., 1869, pp. 27-43.

PUTNAM, S: H.  Story of Company A, Twenty-fifth Mass., 1886, pp. 33-45.

SMITH, J. E.  A famous battery, 1861-64 (4th N. Y. Independent Battery), 1892, pp. 6-10.

SWINTON, W:  History of the Seventh Regiment National Guard, State of New York, 1870, pp. 64-126.

SYPHER, J. R.  History of the Penna. Reserve Corps, 1865, pp. 101-103.

WALCOTT, C: F.  History of Twenty-first Mass. Vols., pp. 9-19.

(161)

1862

JACKMAN, LYMAN.  History of the 6th N. H. Regiment, 1891, pp. 17-22.

(162)

1861-1862

BLAKE, H: N.  Three years in the Army of the Potomac (11th Mass.), 1865, pp. 32-51.

CUDWORTH, W. H.  History of the First Mass. Infantry, pp. 96-135.

HAYNES, MARTIN A.  History of the Second Regiment N. H. Vol. Infantry, 1896, pp. 42-55.

SMITH, J. E.  A famous battery (4th N. Y. Ind. Battery), pp. 41-43.

(163)

1861

ALLEN, G: H.  Forty-six months with the 4th R. I. Vols., 1887, pp. 24-36.

(164)

1861

CADWELL, C: K.  Old Sixth Regiment (Conn. Vols.), pp. 18-19.

CUDWORTH, WARREN H.  History of the 1st Regiment Mass. Infantry, 1866, pp. 24-25.

CUFFEL, C: A.  Independent Battery D.  Durell’s Battery in the Civil War, 1900, p. 21.

LEWIS, G:  History of Battery E, 1st Regiment R. I. Light Artillery, 1892, pp. 7-8.

PARKER, J: L., and CARTER, R. G.  History of the 22nd Mass. Infantry, and 2nd Company Sharpshooters, and the 3rd Light Battery, 1887, p. 42.

PRICE, ISAIAH.  History of the 97th Regiment Penna. Vol. Infantry, 1875, pp. 86-87.

SMITH, J. E.  A famous battery (4th N. Y. Ind. Battery), pp. 37-38.

57

(165)

1861-1862

BANES, C: H.  History of the Phila. Brigade: 69th, 71st, 72d, and 106th Penna. Vols., 1876, pp. 22-39.

C., T. E.  Battlefields of the South, 2 vols., 1863, vol. 1, pp. 114-126.

FORD, ANDREW E.  Story of the 15th Regiment Mass. Vol. Infantry, 1898, pp. 47-48, 51-69.

KELSEY, D. M.  Deeds of daring by both Blue and Gray, 1891, pp. 74-84.

MCDERMOTT, A. W., and REILLY, J: E.  Brief history of the 69th Regiment Penna. Vet. Vols., pp. 8-9.

WARD, JOSEPH R. C.  History of the 106th Regiment Penna. Vols., 1883, pp. 5-21.

(166)

1861-1862

Dam No. 4.  Skirmish, Dec. 11, 1861.  Rebellion Record; F. Moore, ed., vol. 3; Doc. 225, pp. 465-466.

Affair near Williamsport (Dam No. 5), Dec. 9, 1861.  Rebellion Record; F. Moore, ed., vol. 3; Doc. 217, pp. 457-458.

BAYLOR, G:  Bull Run to Bull Run, or four years in the Army of Northern Virginia, 1900, pp. 30, 32.

BOYCE, C. W.  Brief history of the 28th Regiment N. Y. S. Vols., pp. 19-23, 82-84, 95-96.

BROWN, E. R.  The 27th Indiana Vol. Infantry, 1861-1865.  1899, pp. 50-96.

BROWN, J. WILLARD.  The Signal Corps, U. S. A., in the Rebellion, 1896, pp. 51-53, 61, 65.

BRYANT, EDWIN E.  History of the 3d Regiment of Wisconsin Veteran Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865. 1891, pp. 16-18, 23-28, 36-39.

CLARK, C: M.  History of the 39th Regiment Illinois Vol. Vet. Infantry, pp. 18-19, 20-26, 27-50, 51-53, 57.

COOK, B: F.  History of the 12th Mass. Vols. (Webster Regiment), 1882, pp. 25-39.

DAVIS, CHAS. E., jr.  Story of the 13th Mass. Vols., 1894, pp. 2-19.

HUSSEY, G. A.  History of the Ninth Regiment (83d N. Y. Volunteers), 1889, pp. 34-35, 47-57, 64-106, 184-199, 202-204, 211, 263-267, 289-292.

MARVIN, EDWIN E.  The 5th Regiment Conn. Vols., 1889, pp. 31-50.

QUINT, A.  Potomac and the Rapidan (2nd Mass.), pp. 62-99, 150-156.

QUINT, ALONZO H.  Record of the 2nd Mass. Infantry, 1867, pp. 43-67.

SYPHER, J. R.  History of the Penna. Reserve Corps, p. 103.

58

WOODWARD, E. M.  Our campaigns (2d Penna. Reserves), 1865, pp. 45-47, 51-62.

(167)

1862

Hancock, report of T: J. Jackson of bombardment of, Jan. 5, 1862.  War of the Rebellion: Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, series i, vol. v, chap. xiv, pp. 389-395.

MARVIN, E. E.  The 5th Regiment Conn. Vols. (Infantry), pp. 51-60.

(168)

1862

BILLINGS, J: D.  History of the 10th Mass. Battery of Light Artillery, 1881, pp. 14-15, 27.

BLOODGOOD, Rev. J. D.  Personal reminiscences of the War, 1893, pp. 17-18, 28-30.

BROWN, E. R.  The 27th Indiana Vol. Infantry, pp. 273-279.

BROWN, J. WILLARD.  The Signal Corps, U. S. A., in the Rebellion, pp. 227-229, 241-242.

BRYANT, EDWIN E.  History of the 3d Wisconsin Regiment Vet. Vol. Inf., p. 39.

BUFFUM, F. H.  History of the 14th Regiment N. H. Vols., 1882, pp. 60-63, 67-99.

CAMPER, C:, and KIRKLEY, J. W.  Historical Record of the 1st Regiment Maryland Infantry, 1871, pp. 88-89.

COLLINS, G: K.  Memoirs of the 149th Regiment N. Y. Vol. Infantry, 1891, pp. 21-39.

DENISON, FREDERIC.  Sabres and spurs: 1st Regiment Rhode Island Cavalry, 1876, pp. 41-42, 156-168.

FORD, ANDREW E.  Story of the 15th Regiment Mass. Vol. Infantry, p. 138.

GOODHART, BRISCOE.  History of the Independent Loudoun, Virginia, Rangers (U. S. Vol. Cav., Scouts), 1896, p. 44.

GOODHART, BRISCOE.  History of the Independent Loudoun, Virginia, Rangers, pp. 77-79.

GORDON, G: H.  War diary, 1882, pp. 1-31.

HAYNES, E. M.  History of the 10th Regiment Vermont Vols., 1870, pp. 18-28.

LEWIS, G:  Battery E, 1st Rhode Island Artillery, p. 112.

LEWIS, O.  The 138th Regiment Penna. Vol. Infantry, pp. 25-28.

MARVIN, EDWIN E.  The 5th Regiment Conn. Vol. Infantry, pp. 237-240.

NORTON, HENRY.  Deeds of daring (8th N. Y. V. Cavalry), 1889, pp. 17, 27-33.

RAUSCHER, FRANK.  Music on the march; with the Army of the Potomac (114th Reg. P. V. Collis’ Zouaves), 1892, pp. 21-23.

59

(169)

1861

CHENEY, NEWEL.  History of the 9th N. Y. Vol. Cavalry.  1901, pp. 24-25.

1862

BAKER, LEVI W.  History of the 9th Mass. Battery, 1888, pp. 20-21.

HAYS, E. Z.  History of the 32d Regiment O. V. V. I., 1896, p. 35.

HOPKINS, W: P.  The 7th Regiment Rhode Island Vols. in the Civil War, 1903, pp. 9-11.

LINCOLN, W: S.  Life with the Thirty-fourth Mass. Infantry, 1879, pp. 24-25.

MCKEE, JAMES H.  Back in “war times.” History of the 144th Regiment N. Y. V. Infantry, 1903, pp. 62-64.

MOWRIS, J. A.  History of the 117th Regiment N. Y. Vols., 1866, pp. 34-35.

ROBACK, H:, ed.  Veteran volunteers of Herkimer and Otsego Counties (152d N. Y. V.), 1888, pp. 17-19.

SMITH, A. P.  History of the 76th Regiment N. Y. Vols., 1867, pp. 40-41.

STORRS, J: W.  The “20th Connecticut,” 1886, pp. 25-26.

THOMPSON, J: C. (R. W. Rock).  History of the 11th Regiment R. I. Vols., 1881, pp. 19-20.

THORPE, SHELDON B.  History of the 15th Conn. Vols., 1893, pp, 17-18.

(170)

1862

SIMONS, EZRA D.  The 125th N. Y. State Vols., 1888, pp. 20-21, 36-37.

WILLSON, ARABELLA M.  Disaster, struggle, triumph (126th Regiment N. Y. S. Vols.), 1870, pp. 101-102, 104-105.

(171)

1862

B. & O. R. R., Protection and defense of.  War of the Rebellion: Official Records of Union and Confederate Armies, series i, vol. li, Pt. i, chap. lxiii.

LEWIS, O.  History of the 138th Regiment Penna. V. I., 1866, pp. 15-25.

MCCLELLAN, G: B.  McClellan’s own story, pp. 190-192.

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1862

THOMPSON, S. MILLETT.  13th Regiment of New Hampshire Vol. Infantry, 1888, pp. 27-31.

WALKER, W: C.  See also Upper Marlboro expedition (18th Conn.), p. 52.

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1862-1863

WALKER, W: C.  History of the 18th Regiment Conn. Volunteers, 1885, pp. 52-89.

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1862

BAYLOR, G:  Bull Run to Bull Run (C. S. A.), pp. 89-91.

BENTON, C: E.  As seen from the ranks (105th N. Y. State Vols.), 1902, pp. 12-20.

CAMPER, C:, and KIRKLEY, J. W.  Historical Record of the 1st Regiment Maryland Infantry, pp. 81-88.

60

POWERS, G: W.  Story of the 38th Regiment Mass. Vols., 1866, pp. 12-23.

SWINTON, W:  History of the 7th N. Y. Regiment, pp. 238-291.

WALKER, W: C.  History of the 18th Regiment Conn. Volunteers, pp. 26-52.

WINGATE, G: W.  History of the 22d Regiment of the National Guard of the State of N. Y., 1896, pp. 40-53, 55-56.

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1862

Frederick, Evacuation of, by Union forces, Sept. 6, 1862.  War of the Rebellion: Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, series i, vol. li, Pt. i, chap. lxiii, pp. 136-137.

Frederick, The Rebel Army in, Sept. 21, 1862.  Rebellion Record; F. Moore, ed., vol. v; Doc. 202, pp. 606-608.

STEINER, LEWIS H.  Report of L. H. Steiner, M.D., inspector of the sanitary commission, containing a diary kept during the rebel occupation of Frederick, Md.; and an account of the operations of the U. S. sanitary commission during the campaign in Maryland, Sept., 1862.

RENO, CONRAD.  General Jesse L. Reno at Frederick, Barbara Fritchie and her flag.  Civil War Papers, 2 vols., 1900, vol. 2, pp. 553-569.

SEILHEIMER, G: O.  Historical basis of Whittier’s “Barbara Fritchie.*#8221;  Johnson, R. W., and Buel, C. C., eds.  Battles and leaders of the Civil War, 4 vols., 1887-88, vol. 2, pp. 618-619.

FRITCHIE, BARBARA (1766-1862).  A study; by Caroline H. Dall, 1892.

FRITCHIE, BARBARA (1766-1862).  Life of Whittier’s heroine, including a sketch of historic “Old Frederick*#8221;; by H: M. Nixdorff, 1887.
See also WHITTIER, J. G.  Poems.

COLGROVE, SILAS.  Finding of Lee’s lost order.  Johnson, R. W., and Buel, C. C., eds.  Battles and leaders of the Civil War, 4 vols., 1887-88, vol. 2, p. 603.

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1862

Maryland campaign, Sept. 3-20, 1862.  War of the Rebellion: Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, series i, vol. xix, Pt. i, chap. xxxi, pp. 157-1055; Pt. ii, correspondence, etc.

Maryland, Operations in, Oct., 1862.  Rebellion Record; by F. Moore, ed., vol. 6.  Gen. McClellan’s report, Doc. 2, pp. 8-14; Doc. 5, pp. 16-18.

The Maryland campaign, Sept. 3-20, 1862 (Union).  War of the Rebellion: Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, series i, vol. li, Pt. i, chap. lxiii, pp. 137-171, 831-833; (Confederate), vol. li, Pt.2.

61

Maryland campaign, Sept. 3-20, 1862.  War of the Rebellion: Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, series iii, vol. ii, and series iv, vol. ii.

South Mountain, battle of.  Rebellion Record; F. Moore, ed., vol. 5, Doc. 119, pp. 432-439.

Antietam, Battle of.  Rebellion Record; F. Moore, ed., vol. 5, Doc. 122, pp. 454-476.

Antietam, Battle of.  Rebellion Record; F. Moore, ed., vol. 9. Gen. Gordon’s report, Doc. 9, pp. 251-254.

Summer campaign of 1862.  Rebellion Record; F. Moore, ed., vol. 9, Doc. 16, pp. 569-726.

Invasion of Maryland.  Rebellion Record; F. Moore, ed., supplement, vol. i, Doc. 104, pp. 755-757.

The Maryland campaign.  Confederate Military History, 12 vols., 1899, v. 3, pp. 335-359; v. 4, pp. 106-132; v. 5, pp. 140-164; v. 6, p. 184.

ALLAN, W:  First Maryland campaign.  Southern Historical Society papers, v. xiv, 1886, pp. 102-118.

ALLAN, W:  Strategy of the campaign of Sharpsburg or Antietam.  Massachusetts Military Historical Society, 1903.  Campaigns in Virginia, Maryland and Penna., 1862-1863, v. 3, pp. 73-103.

ALLAN, W:  The Army of Northern Virginia in 1862.  1892, pp. 322-328, 343-447.

ALLEN, G: H.  Forty-six months with the 4th R. I. Vol., pp. 139-150.

BANES, C: H:  History of the Phila. Brigade, pp. 107-120.

BAYLOR, G:  Bull Run to Bull Run (C. S. A.), p. 73.

BEACH, W: H.  The 1st N. Y. (Lincoln) Cavalry, 1902, pp. 168-176.

BENNETT, A. J.  Story of the 1st Mass. Light Battery, 1886, pp. 72-84.

BENNETT, EDWIN C.  Musket and sword, pp. 91-107.

BERNARD, G: S.  War talks of Confederate Veterans, 1892, pp. 9-42.  299-307 in the appendix.

BOLTON, H. W.  Personal reminiscences, 1892, pp. 47-54.

BOOTH, G: W.  Personal reminiscences (C. S. A.), pp. 70-72.

BORCKE, HEROS VON.  Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence, 2 vols., 1866, v. 1, pp. 185-253, 301-308.

BOWEN, JAMES L.  History of the Thirty-seventh Regiment Mass. Vols., 1884, pp. 37-41, 66-72, 75-90.

BOYCE, C. W.  Brief history of the 28th N. Y. S. Vols., pp. 45-47.

62

BROWN, E. R.  The 27th Indiana Vol. Infantry, pp. 224-279.

BROWN, J. W.  Signal Corps, U. S. A., in the Rebellion, pp. 325-337.

BRYANT, EDWIN E.  The 3rd Regiment of Wisconsin Vet. Vol. Infantry, pp. 118-135.

BURNSIDE, AMBROSE E. (1824-81).  Life; by B. P. Poore, 1882, pp. 162-178.

C., T. E.  Battlefields of the South, v. 2, pp. 324-371.

CARRUTH, S., and others.  History of the 35th Regiment Mass. Vols., 1884, pp. 20-37, 57-58.

CASLER, J: O.  Four years in the Stonewall Brigade, 1893, pp. 168-169.

CHESNEY, C. C.  Military view of recent campaigns in Virginia and Maryland, 2 vols., 1863 and 1865, v. 1, pp. 101-137.

CHILD, W:  The 5th Regiment N. H. Volunteers, pp. 101-133.

CLARK, WALTER., ed.  Histories of the several regiments and battalions from North Carolina, 1861-65 (C. S. A.), 5 vols., 1901, v. 5, pp. 71-82, 587-593.

COFFIN, C: C.  Antietam scenes.  Johnson, R. W., and Buel, C. C., eds.  Battles and leaders of the Civil War, 4 vols., 1887-88, v. 2, pp. 682-685.
See also Century Magazine, vol. 10, pp. 315-319.

COFFIN, C: C.  Stories of our soldiers, 2 vols., 1893, v. 1, pp. 27-38, 140-155; v. 2, pp. 99-103.

COLTON, ARTHUR.  A debatable land.  (Antietam.)

Company “D,” 13th Regiment N. J. Vols.  Historical sketch, 1875, pp. 11-18.

CONYNGHAM, D. P.  The Irish Brigade and its campaigns, 1867, pp. 294-317.

COOK, B: F.  History of the 12th Mass. Vols., pp. 66-75.

COWTAN, C: W.  Services of the 10th N. Y. Vols., 1882, pp. 144-148.

COX, J. D.  Forcing Fox’s Gap and Turner’s Gap.  Johnson, R. W., and Buel, C. C., eds.  Battles and leaders of the Civil War, 4 vols., 1887-88, v. 2, pp. 583-590.

COX, J. D.  Battle of Antietam.  Johnson, R. W., and Buel, C. C., eds.  Battles and leaders of the Civil War, 4 vols., 1887-88, v. 2, pp. 630-660.

COX, J. D.  Military reminiscences of the Civil War, 2 Vols., 1900, v. 1, pp. 263-353.

CRAFTS, W. A.  The Southern Rebellion, v. 2, pp. 212-264.

63

CRATER, LEWIS.  History of the 50th Regiment Penna. Vet. Vols., 1884, pp. 32-38.

CROTTY, D. G.  Four years campaigning in the Army of Potomac (3d Mich. Vol. Infantry), 1874, pp. 68-70.

CROWNINSHIELD, B: W.  History of the 1st Mass. Cavalry Vols., 1891, pp. 68-92.

CUFFEL, C: A.  Independent Battery D.  Durell’s Battery in the Civil War, pp. 71-90.

CURTIS, O. B.  History of the 24th Michigan of the Iron Brigade, 1891, pp. 58-71.

DAVENPORT, A.  Camp and field life of the 5th N. Y. Vol. Infantry, pp. 310-329.

DAVIS, C: E., jr.  The story of the 13th Mass.  Vols., pp. 131-152.

DAVIS, G: B.  The Antietam campaign.  Massachusetts Military Historical Society, 1903, vol. 3.  Campaigns in Virginia, Maryland and Penna., 1862-1863, pp. 27-72.

DAWES, R. R.  On the right at Antietam.  Force, M. F., and others.  Sketches of war history, 1861-1865.  4 vols., 1888-96, v. 3, pp. 252-263.

DAWES, R. R.  The 6th Wisconsin Vols., pp. 78-104.

DICKERT, D. A:  History of Kershaw’s Brigade, 1899, pp. 151-165.

DOUGLAS, H: KYD.  Stonewall Jackson in Maryland.  Johnson, R. W., and Buel, C. C., eds.  Battles and leaders of the Civil War, 4 vols., 1887-88, v. 2, pp. 620-629.
See also Century Magazine, v. 10, 1886, pp. 285-295.

EDDY, RICHARD.  The 60th Regiment N. Y. S. Vols., pp. 172-183.

ELLIS, T: T.  Leaves from the diary of an army surgeon, 1863, pp. 239-296, 306-307.

FAIRCHILD, C. B., comp.  History of the 27th Regiment N. Y. Vols., pp. 90-100.

FIGG, R. W.  “Where men only dare to go!” or Story of a boy company (C. S. A.), 1885, pp. 38-58.

FORD, ANDREW E.  Story of the 15th Regiment Mass. Vol. Infantry, pp. 187-198.

FRANKLIN, W: B.  Notes on Crampton’s Gap and Antietam.  Johnson, R. W., and Buel, C. C., eds.  Battles and leaders of the Civil War, 4 vols., 1887-88, v. 2, pp. 591-597.

FREDERICK, GILBERT.  Story of a regiment (57th N. Y. V. I.), 1895, pp. 83-103.

64

GARNETT, JAMES M., and HUNTER, ALEX.  The battle of Antietam or Sharpsburg.  Reminiscences of Jackson’s Old Division.  Comments by Alex. R. Chisolm.  Southern Historical Society papers, vol. xxxi, 1903, pp. 32-45.

GERRISH, THEODORE.  Army life (20th Maine), 1882, pp. 20-29, 30-49.

GERRISH, T., and HUTCHINSON, J: S.  The blue and the gray, 1884, pp. 140-164.

GILMOR, Col. HARRY.  Four years in the saddle, 1866, pp. 56-59.

GLAZIER, W.  Battles for the Union, 1875, pp. 197-204.

GLAZIER, WILLARD.  Three years in the Federal Cavalry, 1872, pp. 99-102.

GOODHART, B.  Independent Loudoun, Virginia, Rangers, pp. 55-58.

GORDON, J: B.  Antietam and Chancellorsville.  Scribner’s Magazine, vol. xxxiii, No. 6, June, 1903, pp. 685-699.

GORDON, J: B.  Reminiscences of the Civil War, 1903, pp. 80-91.

GOSS, W. L.  Recollections of a private, 1890, pp. 104-119.

GOULD, J: M.  History of 1st, 10th, 29th Maine Regiment, pp. 222-264.

GRACEY, S. L.  Annals of the 6th Penna. Cavalry, 1868, pp. 89-110.

GRAHAM, MATTHEW J.  The Ninth Regiment N. Y. Volunteers (Hawkins’ Zouaves), 1900, pp. 255-353.

HALE, E: E., ed.  Stories of the war, 1880, pp. 61-73.

HARDIN, M. D.  History of the 12th Regiment Penna. Reserve Vol. Corps, 1890, pp. 112-129.

HILL, A. F.  Our boys (8th Penna.), pp. 387-410.

HILL, D. H.  The battle of South Mountain, or Boonsboro.  Johnson, R. W., and Buel, C. C., eds.  Battles and leaders of the Civil War, 4 vols., 1887-88, v. 2, pp. 559-581.
See also Century Magazine, vol. 10, 1886, pp. 137-152.

HOLSTEIN, Mrs. A. M.  Three years in field hospitals, 1867, pp. 9-25.

HORTON, J. H., and TREVERBAUGH, S.  A history of the 11th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry, 1866, pp. 68-80.

HOUGH, F. B.  History of Duryee’s Brigade, 1864, pp. 106-125.

HUBBELL, W: S., and others.  Story of the 21st Regiment Conn. Vol. Infantry, 1900, pp. 46-51.

65

HUNTER, A.  A high private’s account of the battle of Sharpsburg.  Southern Historical Society Papers, vol. x, 1882, pp. 503-512; vol. xi, pp. 10-21.

HUSSEY, G. A.  History of the 9th Regiment (83d) N. Y. V. C., pp. 79-211.

HYDE, T: W.  Following the Greek cross, pp. 89-107.

HYNDMAN, W:  History of a cavalry company (4th Penna. Cav., Comp. A), 1870, pp. 65-68.

JACKMAN, L.  History of the 6th N. H. Regiment, pp. 98-116.

JACKSON, T: J., Stonewall (1824-1863).  Life and military career; by M. Addey, 1863, pp. 156-176.

JACKSON, T: J,, Stonewall (1824-1863).  By J: E. Cooke, 1876, pp. 307-347.

JACKSON, T: J., Stonewall (1824-1863).  Life and campaigns; by R. L. Dabney, 1866, pp. 545-576.

JACKSON, T: J., Stonewall (1824-1863).  Life; by J. M. Daniels, 1863, pp. 195-217.

JACKSON, T: J., Stonewall (1824-1863).  Stonewall Jackson and the American Civil War; by G. F. R. Henderson, 2 vols., 1898, chapter xix, vol. 1, p. 208; vol. 2, pp. 353-355, 412, 420, 439, 458, 468, 593, 601.

JACKSON, T: J., Stonewall (1824-1863).  Life and letters; by M. A. Jackson, 1892, pp. 343-357.

JACKSON, T: J., Stonewall (1824-1863).  Memoirs; by M. A. Jackson, 1895, pp. 329-343.

JACKSON, T: J., Stonewall (1824-1863).  By S. L. Jones, 1863, pp. 122-126.

JACKSON, T: J., Stonewall (1824-1863).  Life; by S. N. Randolph, 1876, pp. 238-256.

JOHNSON, B. T.  Address on the first Maryland campaign.  Southern Historical Society Papers, v. xii, 1884, pp. 500-535.

JOHNNSON, R. W., and BUEL, C. C., eds.  Battles and leaders of the Civil War, 4 vols., 1887-88, v. 2, pp. 599-603.

JOHNSTON, J. S.  A reminiscence of Sharpsburg.  Southern Historical Society Papers, v. viii, pp, 526-529.

JONES, E. R.  Four years in the Army of the Potomac, pp. 75-85.

JONES, S. L.  Life in the South, v. 2, pp. 389-392.  (Baltimore.)

JUDD, DAVID W.  Story of the 33d N. Y. S. Vols., 1864, pp. 179-211.

JUDSON, A. M.  History of the 83d Regiment Penna. Vols., pp. 53-55.

66

KING, D: H., GIBBS, A. J., and NORTHRUP, J. H., comps.  History of the 93d Regiment N. Y. V. Infantry, 1895, p. 44.

KING, W. E., and DERBY, W. P.  Campfire sketches and battlefield echoes, pp. 120-126, 147-149.

LEE, ROBERT E. (1807-1870).  Life and campaigns; by E: L. Childe, 1875, pp. 138-160.

LEE, ROBERT E. (1807-1870).  General Lee; by Fitzhugh Lee (Great Commanders), 1894, pp. 200-219.

LEE, ROBERT E. (1807-1870).  Memoirs; by A. L. Long, 1886, pp. 203-224.

LEE, ROBERT E. (1807-1870).  Life and campaigns; by J. D. McCabe, 1870, pp. 233-276.

LEE, ROBERT E. (1807-1870).  Life; by E. V. Mason, 1872, pp. 133-146.

LEE, ROBERT E. (1807-1870).  Life and campaigns; by S: W. Odell, 1895, pp. 310-328.

LEE, ROBERT E. (1807-1870).  Robert E. Lee and the Southern Confederacy; by H. A. White, 1897, pp. 198-228.

LEWIS, C: B.  Field, fort, and fleet, 1885, pp. 143-144, 147-152.

LIGHTSEY, ADA C.  The veteran’s story (C. S. A., 16th Miss. Reg., Co. F—R. J. Lightsey), 1899, p. 23.

LOCKE, W: H.  Story of the regiment (the 11th Penna. Infantry), pp. 118-152.

LONGSTREET, JAMES.  From Manassas to Appomattox, 1896, pp. 199-289.

LONGSTREET, JAMES.  Invasion of Maryland.  Johnson, R. W., and Buel, C. C., eds. Battles and leaders of the Civil War, 4 vols., v. 2, pp. 663-674.
See also Century Magazine, vol. 10, 1886, pp. 309-315.

LORD, EDWARD O., ed.  History of the 9th Regiment N. H. Vols., 1895, pp. 48-163.

LYLE, Rev. W. W.  Lights and shadows of army life (11th Reg. O. V. I.), 1865, pp. 118-187.

MCCLELLAN, G: B.  McClellan’s own story, 1887, pp. 549-629.

MCCLELLAN, G: B. (1826-1885).  General McClellan and conduct of the War; by W: H: Hurlbert, 1864, pp. 287-302.

MCCLELLAN, G: B.  From the Peninsula to Antietam.  Johnson, R. W., and Buel, C. C., eds.  Battles and leaders of the Civil War, 4 vols., 1887-88, v. 2, pp. 545-555.
See also Century Magazine, vol. 10, 1886, pp. 121-130.

67

MCCLELLAN, G: B. (1826-1885).  Life and campaigns; by G. S. Hillard, 1864, pp. 285-328.

MCDERMOTT, A. W., and REILLY, J: E.  Brief history of the 69th Regiment Penna. Vet. Vols., pp. 19-21.

MACNAMARA, D. G.  History of the Ninth Regiment Mass. Vol. Infantry, 1899, pp. 205-229.

MACNAMARA, M. H.  The Irish Ninth in bivouac and battle, 1867, pp. 117-127, 136-151.

MEADE, G: GORDON; by R: M. Bache, pp. 173-219.

Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the U. S. Missouri Commandery.  War papers, 1892, v. 1, pp. 268-277.  From Second Bull Run to Antietam; by C: F. Morse.

Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the U. S. Minnesota Commandery.  Glimpses of the Nation’s struggle, 4 vols., 1887-98, v. 4, pp. 550-566.

MILLS, J: H.  Chronicles of the 21st Reg. N. Y. S. Vols., pp. 278-313.

MINNIGH, H. N.  Company K, 1st Penna. Reserves, pp. 19-20.

MITCHELL, M. B.  A woman’s recollections of Antietam.  Johnson, R. W., and Buel, C. C., eds.  Battles and leaders of the Civil War, 4 vols., 1887-88, v. 2, pp. 686-695.
See also Century Magazine, v. 10, 1886, pp. 435-443.

MOORE, F.  Women of the war, 1866, pp. 148-155, 189-194, 278-286, 315-319, 373-381, 402-408.

MORFORD, H:  Red-tape and pigeon-hole generals (210th Penna. Vols.), pp. 11-32, 70-119.

MOSS, L.  Annals of the United States Christian Commission, pp. 367-368.

MURPHEY, T: G.  History of the 1st Regiment Delaware Vet. Vols., 1866, pp. 76-80.

NEWCOMER, C. ARMOUR.  Cole’s Cavalry; or three years in the saddle in the Shenandoah Valley, 1895, pp, 43-46.

NEWELL, JOS. KEITH.  “Ours” Annals of the 10th Regiment Mass. Vols., 1875, pp. 141-155.

NICKERSON, A. H.  Antietam (Sharpsburg).  Under both flags, 1896, pp. 109-118, 333-337.

NORTON, H:  Deeds of daring (8th N. Y. V. Cav.), pp. 32-38.

NOYES, G: F.  Battle of Antietam.  Harper’s New Monthly Magazine, vol. xxvii, No. 160, 1863, pp. 537-541.

NOYES, G: F.  Bivouac and battlefield, 1864, pp. 153-268.

68

OPIE, LEE S.  A Rebel cavalryman (6th Virginia Cavalry), 1899, pp. 77-82.

OWEN, W: MILLER.  In camp and battle with the Washington Artillery of New Orleans, 1885, pp. 130-160, 163-167.

OWENS, IRA S.  Greene county soldiers in the late war (74th O. V. I., with sketches of the 12th, 94th, 110th, 44th, 10th Ohio Battery, 154th, 54th, 17th, 34th, and 184th), 1884, pp. 127-128.

PALFREY, F. W.  The Antietam and Fredericksburg, 1882, pp. 1-135.

PALFREY, F. W.  The battles of Antietam.  Massachusetts Military Historical Society, 1903, v. iii, pp. 1-26.

PARIS, Comte de.  Civil War in America, 4 vols., 1875-1888, v. 2, pp. 307-359.

PARKER, T: H.  History of the 51st Reg. of Penna. Vols. and Vet. Vols., pp. 223-251.

PARKER, J: L., and CARTER, R. G.  History of the 22nd Mass. Inf., and 2nd Co. Sharpshooters, and the 3rd Light Battery, pp. 185-208.

PEYSTER, J: WATTS DE.  Decisive conflicts of the late Civil War, 1867, pp. 38-76.

PICKETT, LaS. C.  Pickett and his men, pp. 195-204.

POLLARD, E: A.  Southern history of the war, v. 2, pp. 125-142.

POWELL, W: H.  Fifth Army Corps (Army of the Potomac), 1896, pp. 246-293.

PROWELL, G: R.  Antietam to Appomattox with Corn Exchange Regiment (118th Penna. Vol.), 1892, pp. 26-53.
See also Philadelphia’s Corn Exchange Regiment, by the Survivor’s Association.

QUINT, A.  Potomac and Rapidan (2nd Mass.), pp. 210-249.

QUINT, A. H.  Record of the Second Mass. Inf., pp. 128-143.

RICHARDSON, A. D.  The secret service, the field, the dungeon, and the escape, 1865, pp. 275-290.

ROEMER, J.  Reminiscences of the War of the Rebellion (Battery L, 2d N. Y. Artillery, and 34th N. Y. V. V. Ind. Lt. Battery), 1897, pp. 85-90.

SCHALK, EMIL.  Campaigns of 1862 and 1863. 1863, pp. 119-120.

SCHELL, FRANK H.  Sketching under fire at Antietam.  McClure’s Magazine, vol. xxii, February, 1904, pp. 418-429.

69

SEVILLE, W: P.  History of the 1st Regiment Delaware Volunteers.  Papers of the Historical Society of Delaware, 1884, pp. 45-55.

SLOAN, J: A.  Reminiscences of the Guilford Grays, Co. B, 27th N. C. Regiment, 1883, pp. 40-48.

SMALL, A. R.  The 16th Maine Regiment, 1886, pp. 32-51.

SMITH, A. P.  76th Reg. N. Y. Vols., pp. 147-177.

SMITH, E. P.  Incidents of the U. S. Christian Commission, 1871, pp. 41-47.

SPRENGER, G: F.  Concise history of the camp and field life of the 122d Regiment Penna. Vols., 1885, pp. 68-77.

STEVENS, C. A.  Berdan’s United States sharpshooters, 1892, pp. 194-213.

STEVENS, G: T.  Three years in the Sixth Corps (77th Reg. N. Y. V.), 1872, pp. 134-163.

STEVENS, H. S.  Souvenir of excursion to battlefields by the Society of the 14th Conn. Regiment, in 1891, 1893, pp. 63-68.

STEWART, A. M.  Camp, march, and battlefield; or, three years and a half with the Army of the Potomac, 1865, pp. 224-243, 249-250.

STINE, J. H.  History of the Army of the Potomac, 1893, pp. 154-243.

STONE, E. W.  Rhode Island in the Rebellion, 1864, pp. 145-174.

STRONG, W: W., and others.  121st Regiment Penna. Vols., 1893, pp. 18-21.

STROTHER, D. H.  Personal recollections of the war: Antietam.  Harper’s New Monthly Magazine, vol. xxxvi, No. 213, 1868, pp. 273-291.

STUART, JAS. E. B. (1833-1864).  Life and campaigns; by H. B. McClellan, 1885, pp. 110-135, 138-140, 148-159.  (Skirmishing, Oct. 9-11, in Washington and Montgomery counties.)

STUART, J. E. B.  Cavalry operations on first Maryland campaign.  Southern Historical Society Papers, v. iii, 1877, pp. 281-294.

SWINTON, W:  Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac, 1882, pp. 194-229.

SWINTON, W:  Twelve decisive battles of the war, 1867, pp. 137-177.

SYPHER, J. R.  History of the Penna. Reserve Corps, pp. 361-395.

TAYLOR, W. H.  Four years with General Lee, 1878, pp. 66-74.

70

TENNEY, W. J.  Military and naval history of the Rebellion in the United States, pp. 265-272.

TERRILL, J. NEWTON.  Campaign of the 14th Regiment N. J. Vols., 1884, pp. 7-12.

THOMPSON, D: L.  In the ranks to the Antietam.  Johnson, R. W., and Buel, C. C., eds.  Battles and leaders of the Civil War, 4 vols., 1887-88, v. 2, pp. 556-558.

THOMPSON, D: L.  With Burnside at Antietam.  Johnson, R. W., and Buel, C. C., eds.  Battles and leaders of the Civil War, 4 vols., 1887-88, v. 2, pp. 660-662.

TOBIE, E. P.  History of the First Maine Cavalry, 1887, pp. 91-100.

TODD, W.  79th Highlanders, pp. 227-249.

TOMES, R., and SMITH, B: G.  War with the South, v. 2, pp. 420-454.

TOOMBS, SAMUEL.  Reminiscences of the war; experiences of the 13th Regiment N. J. Vols., pp. 13-27, 31-34, 36.

TROBRIAND, REGIS de.  Four years with the Army of the Potomac, pp. 308-327.

VAUTIER, J: D.  History of the 88th Penna. Vols., 1894, pp. 69-87.

VICTOR, O. J.  Incidents and anecdotes of the Civil War, 1866, pp. 349-369.

WAITE, OTIS F. R.  Vermont in the Great Rebellion, 1869, pp. 139-146.

WALCOTT, C: F.  History of the 21st Mass. Vols., pp. 186-215.

WALKER, F. A.  History of the Second Army Corps in the Army of the Potomac, 1886, pp. 87-126.

WALKER, J: G.  Sharpsburg.  Johnson, R. W., and Buel, C. C., eds.  Battles and leaders of the Civil War, 4 vols., 1887-88, v. 2, pp. 675-682.
See also Century Magazine, vol. 10, 1886, pp. 296-309.

WARD, J. R. C.  106th Reg. Penna. Vols., pp. 84-100.

WASHBURN, G: H.  Military history and record of the 108th Regiment N. Y. Vols., 1862-1894.  1894, pp. 18-33.

WESTBROOK, ROBERT S.  History of the 49th Penna. Vols., 1898, pp. 123-129.

WEYGANT, C: H.  History of the 124th Regiment N. Y. S. V., 1877, pp. 46-50.

WHITE, A. A., and others.  History of the 36th Regiment Mass. Vols., 1884, pp. 12-19.

71

WHITNEY, J. H. E.  The Hawkins Zouaves, their battles and marches (9th N. Y. V.), 1866, pp. 124-159.

WILSON, W: B.  A few acts and actors in the Civil War, pp. 65-82.

WISE, G:  History of the 17th Virginia Infantry (C. S. A.), 1870, pp. 108-119.

WOODBURY, AUGUSTUS.  Major General Ambrose E. Burnside and the 9th Army Corps, 1867, pp. 118-173.

WOODBURY, AUGUSTUS.  The 2d Rhode Island Regiment, 1875, pp. 106-116.

WOODWARD, E. M.  History of the 3rd Penna. Reserve, pp. 171-196.

WOODWARD, E. M.  Our campaigns (2nd Penna.), pp. 193-222.

(177)

1862

Poolesville, Raid on, Nov. 25, 1862.  War of Rebellion: Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, series i, vol. xxi, chap. xxxiii, pp. 11-12.  Raid on, Dec. 12-20, 1862, pp. 691-693.

SMITH, T: W.  Story of a cavalry regiment (11th N. Y. Cav.), 1897, pp. 24, 48-50.

(177a)

1863

Life in Maryland.  Leisure Hour, vol. xii, 1863: pp. 220-221, The Eastern Shore; pp. 229-231, Baltimore; pp. 253-255, Negroes at home; pp. 266-268, In the woods; pp. 284-286, An Eastern-Shore town (Chestertown?).

(178)

1863

BILLINGS, J: D.  History of the 10th Mass. Battery of Light Artillery, pp. 27-54.

GOODHART, B.  Independent Loudoun, Va., Rangers, pp. 80-102.

HAYNES, E. M.  10th Reg. Vermont Vols., pp. 29-38.

WALKER, W: C.  History of 18th Reg. Conn. Vols. (Infantry), pp. 147-150, 169-172.

WINGATE, G: W.  History of the 22nd Reg. of the National Guard of the State of N. Y., pp. 300-310, 325-327.

(179)

1863

WALKER, W: C.  History of 18th Reg. Conn. Vols. (Infantry), p. 52.

(180)

1863

TODD, W.  79th Highlanders, pp. 276-277.

WALKER, W: C.  History of 18th Reg. Conn. Vols. (Infantry), pp. 90-91.

(181)

1863

MOSS, L.  Annals of the United States Christian Commission, pp. 405-407.

RAUSCHER, F.  Music on the march (114th Reg. Penna. V.), pp. 47-58.

(182)

1863

BERNARD, G. S.  War talks of Confederate veterans, pp. 77-86.

72

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1863

BATCHELER, Capt. H. P.  Jonathan at home, 1864, pp. 161-189.

(184)

1863

Seneca Mills, Skirmish at, June 10, 1863.  War of the Rebellion: Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, series i, vol. xxvii, Pt. 2, chap. xxxix, pp. 786-787.

See also Rockville, Rebel attack near, June 28, 1863.  Rebellion Record; F. Moore, ed., v. 7, Doc. 83, pp. 325-326.

(185)

1863

Gettysburg campaign.  War of the Rebellion: Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, series i, vol. xxvii, Pt. i, chap. xxxix; Pt. ii, chap. xxxix, pp. 3-775.

Gettysburg campaign.  War of the Rebellion: Official Records of both Union and Confederate Armies, series i, vol. li, Pt. i, chap. lxiii, pp. 196-206.  Same vol., pt. ii.

Gettysburg campaign.  Rebellion Record; by F. Moore, ed., v. 7, Doc. 20, pp. 84-128; v. 6, Doc. 32, pp. 183-194; v. 6, Doc. 95, pp. 345-347.

BAKER, L. W.  History of the 9th Mass. Battery, pp. 54-55, 83-90.

BANES, C: H.  History of the Philadelphia Brigade, pp. 173-176, 197.

BARTLETT, A. W.  History of the 12th Regiment N. H. Vols., 1897, pp. 116-118, 137-140.

BEACH, W: H.  1st N. Y. (Lincoln) Cavalry, pp. 254-256, 272-274.

BENNETT, A. J.  Story of the 1st Mass. Light Battery, pp. 118-120, 130.

BENNETT, E. C.  Musket and sword, pp. 136, 149-151.

BENTON, C: E.  As seen from the ranks (105th N. Y.), pp. 21-23, 62-63.

BILLINGS, J: D.  History of the 10th Mass. Battery of Light Artillery, pp. 59-68.

BLAKE, H: N.  Three years in the Army of the Potomac (11th Mass.), pp. 198-204, 224-230.

BLOODGOOD, Rev. J. D.  Personal reminiscences of the war, pp. 121-131.

BOIES, ANDREW J.  Record of the 33d Mass. Vol. Infantry, 1880, pp. 31-37.

BOLTON, H. W.  Personal reminiscences.  To Libby Prison; by L. W. Beaudry, pp. 111-116.

BOOTH, G. W.  Personal reminiscences (C. S. A.), pp. 89-89, 93-95.

BOUDRYE, L: N.  Historic records of the 5th N. Y. Cavalry, pp. 68-73, 276-283.

73

BOWEN, JAMES L.  History of the 37th Regiment Mass, Vols., pp. 167-176, 193-199.

BROWN, E. R.  27th Indiana Vol. Infantry, pp. 359-364, 407-410.

BROWN, J. W.  Signal Corps U. S. A. in the Rebellion, pp. 358-359, 649-650.

BRYANT, EDWIN E.  3d Reg. of Wisconsin Vet. Vol. Infantry, pp. 175-177, 208-210.

CASLER, J: O.  Four years in the Stonewall Brigade, pp. 253-254, 259-263.

CAMPER, C:, and KIRKLEY, J. W.  Historical record of the 1st Reg. Maryland Infantry, pp. 102-108.

CHENEY, NEWEL.  History of the 9th N. Y. Vol. Cavalry, pp. 100-102, 117-123.

CHILD, W:  5th Regiment N. H. Volunteers, p. 209.

COLLINS, G: K.  Memoirs of the 149th Regiment N. Y. Vol. Infantry, pp. 127-131, 151-160.

Co. “D,” 13th Reg. N. J. Vols., pp. 25-27.

COOK, B: F.  History of the 12th Mass. Vols., pp, 98-100, 102-106.

COWTAN, C: W.  Services of the 10th N. Y. Vols., pp. 202-206, 214-215.

CRAFT, DAVID.  History of the 141st Regiment Penna. Vols., 1885, pp. 109-112, 138-140.

CRAFTS, W. A.  The Southern Rebellion, v. 2, pp. 425-450.

CROTTY, D. G.  Four years campaigning in the Army of the Potomac, pp. 87-89, 95-96.

CROWNINSHIELD, B: W.  History of the 1st Mass. Cavalry Vols., pp. 160-164.

CUDWORTH, W. H.  1st Regiment Mass. Infantry, pp. 386-390, 406-410.

CURTIS, O. B.  History of the 24th Michigan of the Iron Brigade, pp. 150-152, 193-196.

DAVIS, C: E., jr.  The story of the 13th Mass. Vols., pp. 217-224, 250-256.

DAVIS, G: B.  From Gettysburg to Williamsport.  Massachusetts Military Historical Society, 1903, v. 3, pp. 449-469.

DAWES, R. R.  6th Wisconsin Vols., pp. 156-158, 185-188.

DICKERT, D. A:  History of Kershaw’s Brigade, p. 230.

EDDY, R:  60th Reg. N. Y. S. Vols., pp. 254-258.

FORD, ANDREW E.  Story of the 15th Reg. Mass. Vol. Infantry, pp. 259-262, 286-287.

74

FREDERICK, GILBERT.  Story of a regiment (57th N. Y. Infantry), pp. 163-165, 188-189.

GERRISH, T.  Army life (20th Maine), pp. 95-99.

GERRISH, T., and HUTCHINSON, J: S.  The blue and the gray, pp. 342-345, 370-375.

GILMOR, Col. H.  Four years in the saddle, pp. 92-94, 103-106.

GLAZIER, W.  Three years in the Federal cavalry, pp, 233-243, 270-295.

GOSS, W. L.  Recollections of a private, pp. 175-179, 230-232.

GOULD, J: M.  History of the 1st, 10th, 29th Maine Regiment, pp. 353-355.

GRACEY, S. L.  Annals of the 6th Penna. Cavalry, pp. 178, 182-192.

HAINES, ALANSON A.  History of the 15th Regiment N. J. Vols., 1883, pp. 79, 99-102.

HARDIN, M. D.  History of the 12th Regiment Penna. Reserve Vol. Corps, pp. 141-145, 162-163.

HATFIELD, S. P.  1st Conn. Artillery, pp. 37-38.

HAYNES, M. A.  History of the Second Regiment N. H. Vol. Inf., pp. 163, 190-193.

HUSSEY, G. A.  History of the 9th Regiment (83d N. Y. Vols.), pp. 263-267, 289-292.

HYDE, T: W.  Following the Greek cross, pp. 140-145, 158-163.

HYNDMAN, W:  History of a cavalry company (4th Penna. Cav., Co. A), pp. 101-103, 113-116.

JACOBS, M.  Notes on the Rebel Invasion of Maryland and Pennsylvania, with map, 1864.

JUDSON, A. M.  History of the 83rd Reg. Penna. Vols., pp. 65-66, 73-75.

KEPLER, W:  History of the 4th Regiment Ohio Vol. Infantry, 1886, pp. 122-126, 134-136.

KERBFY, J. O.  The boy spy, 1892, pp. 517-520.

KIEFFER, H. M.  Recollections of a drummer boy (115th Reg. Penna. Vol.), 1886, pp. 132-134, 159-163.

KING, D: H., GIBBS, A. J., and NORTHRUP, J. H., comps.  History of the 93d N. Y. Vols., pp. 49-50.

LEE, ROBERT E.  Life and campaigns; by E: L. Childe, pp. 233-239, 253-254.

LEE, ROBERT E.  General Lee; by Fitzhugh Lee, pp. 264-270, 303-307.

LEE, ROBERT E.  Memoirs; by A. L. Long, pp. 271, 295-300.

75

LEE, ROBERT E.  Life and campaigns; by J. D. McCabe, pp. 371-387, 405-413.

LEE, ROBERT E.  Life; by E. V. Mason, pp. 189-192, 204-212.

LEE, ROBERT E.  Life and campaigns; by S: W. Odell, pp. 356-358, 379-380.

LEE, ROBERT E.  Robert E. Lee and the Southern Confederacy; by H. A. White, pp. 286-291, 320-323.

LEWIS, G:  History of Battery E, 1st Rhode Island Light Artillery, pp. 182-187, 226-227.

LEWIS, O.  138th Reg. Penna. Vol. Infantry, pp. 27-28.

LIGHTSEY, ADA C.  The veteran’ s story (C. S. A., 16th Miss. Reg., Co. F), pp. 33-34, 36.

LOCKE, W: H.  Story of the Regiment (11th Penna. Infantry), pp. 219-224, 247-258.

LONGSTREET, JAS.  From Manassas to Appomattox, pp. 340-345, 426-429.

MCDERMOTT, A. W., and REILLY, J: E.  Brief history of the 69th Regiment Penna. Vet. Vols., pp. 27-34.

MCKEE, J: H.  “Back in war times,” pp, 111-115.

MACNAMARA, D. G.  History of the 9th Reg. Mass. Vol. Inf., pp. 312-314, 332-338.

MACNAMARA, M. H.  The Irish Ninth in bivouac and battle, pp. 194-198.

MARBAKER, T: D.  History of the 11th N. J. Vols., 1898, pp. 87-94, 111-114.

MARVIN, E. E.  The 5th Reg. Conn. Vols., pp. 274, 276-283.

MEADE, G: GORDON (1815-72).  Life; by R: M. Bache, 1897, pp. 286-292, 355-359.

MERRITT, WESLEY.  Personal recollections.  Rodenbough, Theo. F., comp.  From everglade to cañon with the Second Dragoons, 1836-75, 1875, pp. 294-296.

MINNIGH, H. N.  Co. K, 1st Penna. Reserves, pp. 22-23, 27.

MULHOLLAND, ST. CLAIR A.  Story of the 116th Regiment Penna. Infantry, 1899, pp. 128-130, 149-150.

MURPHEY, T: G.  History of the 1st Reg. Delaware Vet. vols., p. 114.

NEWELL, J. K.  “Ours,” Annals of the 10th Reg. Mass. Vols., pp. 220-222, 224-226.

NORTON, H:  Deeds of daring (8th N. Y. V. Cav.), pp. 68-71.

OWEN, W: M.  In camp and battle with the Washington Artillery of New Orleans, pp. 239-240, 257-258.

76

PARIS, Comte de.  Civil War in America, v. 3, pp. 501-537, 698-747.

PARKER, J: L., and CARTER, R. G.  History of the 22nd Mass. Inf., and 2nd Co. Sharpshooters, and the 3rd Light Battery, pp. 328, 350-353.

PICKETT, LaS. C.  Pickett and his men, 1899, pp. 260-265.

POLLARD, E:  A. Southern history of the war, v. 2, pp. 276-280, 284.

POWELL, W: H.  5th Army Corps, pp. 493-509, 562-568.

PROWELL, G: R.  Antietam to Appomattox, pp. 230-234, 278-285.

PYNE, H: R.  History of the 1st N. J. Cavalry (16th Reg. N. J. Vols.), 1871, pp. 161-163, 166.

QUINT, A. H.  Record of the 2nd Mass. Infantry, pp. 177-178, 183-184.

RAUSCHER, F.  Music on the march (114th Reg. Penna. Vol.), pp. 79-85, 102-107.

ROSS, FITZGERALD.  A visit to the cities and camps of the Confederate States, 1865, pp. 30-46, 74-87.

SCOTT, KATE M.  History of the 105th Regiment of Penna. Vols., 1877, pp. 81, 86.

SHELDON, WINTHROP D.  The 27th Conn. Vols., 1866, pp. 73-74, 82-84.

SIMONS, E. D.  125th N. Y. S. Vols., pp. 86-87, 148-149.

SMITH, A. P.  76th Reg. N. Y. Vol. Infantry, pp. 228-233, 252-253.

SMITH, J. E.  A famous battery (4th N. Y. Independent Battery), pp. 97-100, 164-165.

STEVENS, C. A.  Berdan’s U. S. Sharpshooters, pp. 284-285, 346-347.

STEVENS, G: T.  Three years in the Sixth Corps (77th N. Y. Reg.), pp. 236-268.

STINE, J. H.  History of the Army of the Potomac, pp. 442-448, 556-559.

STONE, E. W.  Rhode Island in the Rebellion, pp. 255-273.

STORRS, J: W.  “20th Conn.,” pp. 72-77, 108-109.

STRONG, W: W., et al.  121st Reg. Penna. Vols., pp. 41-44, 57-58.

STUART, J. E. B.  Life and campaigns; by H. B. McClellan, pp. 323-370.

SYPHER, J. R.  History of the Penna. Reserve Corps, pp. 446-450, 483-486.

TAYLOR, W. H.  Four years with General Lee, pp. 90-114.

77

TENNEY, W. J.  Military and naval history of the Rebellion in the United States, pp. 390-397.

TERRILL, J. N.  Campaign of the 14th N. J. Reg., pp. 14-23.

TOBIE, E. P.  History of the 1st Maine Cavalry, pp. 175, 180.

TOMES, R., and SMITH, B: G.  War with the South, v. 3, pp. 147-149.

TOOMBS, SAMUEL.  Reminiscences of the war; experiences of the 13th Reg. N. J. Vols., pp. 70-71, 87-89.

TROBRIAND, REGIS DE.  Four years with the Army of the Potomac, pp. 473-484, 513-526.

UNDERWOOD, ADIN B.  Three years service of the 33d Mass. Inf. Reg., 1881, pp. 109-110, 143.

VAN SANTVOORD, C.  The 120th Regiment N. Y. S. Vols., 1894, pp. 65-72.

VAUTTER, J: D.  History of the 88th Penna. Vols., pp. 103-104, 158.

VICTOR, O. J.  Incidents and anecdotes of the Civil War, pp. 374-387.

WALKER, F. A.  History of the 2d Army Corps in the Army of the Potomac, pp. 261-263, 308-309.

WARD, J. R. C.  106th Reg. Penna. Vols., pp. 147-152, 176-178.

WASHBURN, G: H.  Military history and record of the 108th N. Y. Vols., pp. 47-48.

WESTBROOK, ROBERT S.  History of the 49th Penna. Vols., pp. 152-156.

WEYGANT, C: H.  History of the 124th Reg. N. Y. S. Vols., pp. 166-171, 190-205.

WILLSON, A. M.  Disaster, struggle, triumph (126th Reg. N. Y. S. Vols.), pp. 151-156, 205-206.

WOODWARD, E. M.  Our campaigns (2nd Penna.), pp. 261-262, 278-283.

YOUNG, J. B.  What a boy saw in the army (84th Penna.), pp. 273-287, 362, 368.

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1864

SALA, G: A:  My diary in America, 2 Vols., 1865, v. 2, pp. 350-354.

See also POLLARD, E: A.  Observations in the North, 1865, pp. 98-100.

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1864

CRATER, L.  History of the 50th Reg. Penna. Vet. Vols., p. 51.

MYERS, J: C.  Daily journal of the 192d Reg. Penna. Vols., 1864, pp. 16-24.

PARKER, T: H.  History of the 51st Reg. of Penna. Vols. and Vet. Vols., pp. 533-541.

78

TODD, W.  79th Highlanders, p. 434.

(188)

1864

BILLINGSLEY, A. S.  From the flag to the cross, 1872, p. 77.

COGSWELL, LEANDER W.  History of the 11th N. H. Reg. V. I., 1891, pp. 256-259, 262-279.

HOLSTEIN, Mrs. A. M.  Three years in field hospitals, pp. 91-131.

HOPKINS, W: P.  7th Regiment R. I. Vols. in the Civil War, pp. 160-163.

LORD, E: O., ed.  History of the 9th Reg. N. H. Vols., p. 354.

MOORE:, F.  Women of the war, pp. 148-155, 373-381, 402-408, 485-490.

MOSS, Rev. L.  Annals of the United States Christian Commission, 1868, pp. 318-322.

1865

WHEELOCK, JULIA S.  The boys in white, 1870, pp. 259-261.

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1864-1865

Pt. Lookout.  Prisons.  War of the Rebellion: Records of Union and Confederate Armies, series ii. vols. vii-viii.

Pt. Lookout.  Prison life.  Southern Historical Society Papers, vol. xviii, pp. 113-120, 333-340, 431-435.

ALLEN G: H.  Forty-six months with the 4th R. I., pp. 256-270.

1863-1864

BARTLETT, A. W.  History of the 12th Reg. N. H. Vols., pp. 145-168.

1863-1864

CHILD, W:  5th Reg. N. H. Vols., pp. 237-249.

1864

MOSS, Rev. L.  Annals of the United States Christian Commission, 1868, pp. 318-322.

1864

Ross, F.  A visit to the cities and camps of the Confederate States, p. 275.

1864-1865

WALKER, THAD. J.  Reminiscences of Pt. Lookout (2d Md. Cav.).  Under both flags, 1896, pp. 416-417.

(190)

1864

SHERMAN, S. M.  The 133d Regiment O. V. I., 1896, pp. 58-59.

(191)

1864

HOUSTON, H: C.  The 32d Maine Regiment of Infantry Vols., 1903, pp. 62-64.

(192)

1864

Operations in the Shenandoah Valley.  War of the Rebellion: Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, series i, vol. xxxvii, Pt. i, chap. xlix, pp. 169-770.  Same vol., pt. ii.

BAYLOR, G:  Bull Run to Bull Run (C. S. A.), pp. 273-276.

IRWIN, R. B.  History of the Nineteenth Army Corps, 1892, pp. 355-367.

79

LINCOLN, W: S.  Life with the 34th Mass. Inf., pp. 195-200, 218-220.

NEWCOMER, C. A.  Cole’s Cavalry; or, three years in the saddle in the Shenandoah Valley, pp. 113-114.

NORTON, CHAUNCEY S., ed.  “The Red Neckties,” or history of the 15th N. Y. V. Cavalry, 1891, pp. 45-57.

WALKER, ALDACE F.  The Vermont Brigade in the Shenandoah Valley, 1869, pp. 37-39.

(193)

1864

Monocacy, Battle of, July 9, 1864.  War of the Rebellion: Official Records of Union and Confederate Armies, series i, vol. li, Pt. i, chap. lxiii, pp. 1171-1177.

Invasion of Maryland.  Rebellion Record; F. Moore, ed., v. ii, Doc. 28, pp. 153-157.

Monocacy, Battle of.  Rebellion Record; F. Moore, ed., v. ii, Doc. 108, pp. 613-626.

BEECHER, H. H.  Record of the 114th N. Y. S. Vols., pp. 379-398.

BOOTH, G: W.  Personal reminiscences of a Maryland soldier, pp. 123-132.

BOWEN, J. L.  History of the 37th Reg. Mass. Vols., pp. 349-350.

BROWN, J. W.  Signal Corps U. S. A. in the Rebellion, pp. 674-679.

CRAFTS, W. A.  The Southern Rebellion, v. 2, pp. 559-561.

EARLY, J. A.  Memoir of the last year of the War of Independence in the Confederate States of America, 1867, pp. 31-107.

EARLY, J. A.  Expedition into Maryland—battle of Monocacy and advance on Washington.  Southern Historical Society Papers, v. ix, 1881, pp. 74-76.

Early’s invasion of Maryland.  Southern Historical Society Papers, v. xviii, pp. 83-85, 244-247.

GILMOR, Col. H.  Four years in the saddle, pp. 187-204.

GOLDSBOROUGH, E: Y.  Battle of Monocacy.

GOODHART, B.  Independent Loudoun, Va., Rangers, pp. 131-144.

GOULD, J: M.  History of 1st, 10th, 29th Maine Regiment, pp. 470-474.

GORDON, J: B.  Battle of Monocacy.  Southern Historical Society Papers, v. vii, 1879, pp. 173-176.

GORDON, J: B.  Reminiscences of the Civil War, pp. 309-313.

GRACEY, S. L.  Annals of the 6th Penna. Cavalry, pp. 278-280.

80

HAYNES, E. M.  History of the 10th Regiment Vermont Vols., pp. 88-102.

KING, W. E., and DEREBY, W. P.  Campfire sketches and battlefield echoes, pp. 341-342.

LEWIS, O.  138th Reg. Penna. Vol. Infantry, pp. 112-121.

LINCOLN, W: S.  Life with the 34th Mass. Inf., pp. 338-342.

LUFKIN, EDWIN B.  History of the 13th Maine Regiment, 1898, pp. 99-103.

OWENS, IRA S.  Green Co. soldiers in the late war (74th O. V. I.), pp. 149-150.

PELLET, E. P.  History of the 114th Reg. N. Y. S. Vols., pp. 248-249.

POLLARD, E: A.  Southern History of the war, v. 4, pp. 57-60.

POWERS, G: W.  Story of the 38th Reg. Mass. Vols., pp. 160-161.

PROWELL, G: R.  History of the 87th Reg. Penna. Vols., pp. 172-196.

RAWLING, C: J.  History of the 1st Regiment Virginia Infantry, 1887, pp. 195, 198, 217.

RIDDLE, A. G.  Recollections of war times, 1895, pp. 285-292.

ROE, A. SEELYE.  The 9th N. Y. Heavy Artillery, 1899, pp. 121-141.

TENNEY, W. J.  Military and naval history of the Rebellion in the U. S., pp. 585-587.

TERRILL, J. N.  Campaign of the 14th N. J. Reg., pp. 72-82.

TOMES, R., and SMITH, B. G.  War with the South, v. 3, pp. 371-375.

WALKER, W: C.  History of the 18th Reg. Conn. Vols., pp. 295-299.

WESTBROOK, R: S.  History of the 49th Penna. Vols., pp. 212-217.

WILSON, W: B.  A few acts and actors in the Civil War, pp. 84-87.

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1864

Maryland, Operations in, Aug. 4-31.  War of the Rebellion: Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, series i, v. xliii, Pt. i, chap. lv, pp. 681-1013.

BOUDRYE, L. N.  Historic records of the 5th N. Y. Cavalry, pp. 167-168.

81

Cove Point, Affair at, Aug. 22.  War of the Rebellion: Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, series i, vol. xliii, Pt. 1, chap. lv, p. 637.

NORTON, H:  Deeds of daring (8th N. Y. Vol. Cav.), pp. 88-89.

(195)

1864

Adamstown, Skirmish at, Oct. 14.  War of the Rebellion: Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, series i, v. xliii, Pt. 2, chap. lv, pp. 369-377.

Montgomery Co., Operations in, Oct. 7-11.  War of the Rebellion: Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, series i, v. xliii, Pt. 1, chap. lv, pp.,644-645.  Same vol., Pt. ii, pp. 310-365.

GILMOR, CoL H.  Four years in the saddle, pp. 215-218.

RAWLING, C: J.  History of the 1st Virginia Infantry, p. 217.

(196)

1865

Cumberland, Raid on, Feb. 21.  War of the Rebellion: Official records of the Union and Confederate Armies, series i, v. xlvi, Pt. 1, chap. lviii, pp. 468-472; Pt. ii, chap. lviii, pp. 621, 626.

BAYLOR, G:  Bull Run to Bull Run (C. S. A.), pp. 296-297.

(197)

1865

Capture of the steamer Harriet De Ford near Fair Haven, Chesapeake Bay, Apr. 4.  War of the Rebellion: Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, series i, v. xlvi, Pt. 1, chap. lviii, pp. 1305-1307.

(198)

1865

BEECHER, H. H.  Record of the 114th N. Y. S. Vols., pp. 478-479, 491-492.

POWERS, G: W.  Story of the 38th Reg. Mass. Vols., pp. 180-190.

(199)

1865

KENNAWAY, J: H.  On Sherman’s track, 1867, pp. 231-235.

1865?

PHILLIPS, P.  Song pilgrimage, 1880, pp. 86-87.

(200)

1865?

KERR, WILL C., .ps.  (W: Furniss.)  Rip raps, 1871, v. 2, pp. 5, 11-15.

(201)

1865

TROWBRIDGE, J. T.  The South, 1866, pp. 40-63.

(202)

1859-1865

TOWNSEND, G: A:  Katy of Catoctin.

1861-1869

EMORY, FREDERIC.  A Maryland manor.

1862-1864

BABCOCK, W: H:  Kent Fort Manor.

(203)

1817-1865

DAVIS, H: WINTER (1817-1865).  Speeches and addresses; with life and character; by J: A. J. Cresswell, 1867.
See also Distinguished American lawyers; by H. W. Scott, 1891, pp. 285-290.

(204)

1866

MORRIS, C:, comp.  Half hours of travel at home and abroad, 1896, 4 vols., v. 1, p. 42.

82

(205)

1867

CLERK, Mrs. G.  The Antipodes and round the world, 1870, pp. 603-604, 615-617.

(206)

1867

ZINCKE, F. B.  Last winter in the United States, 1868, pp. 32-33.

186-

ROSS, G:  The great country; or, Impressions of America.  London, 1868, Chapter on Baltimore.

DIXON, HEPWORTH.  Maryland and Marylanders.  New Eclectic, vol. ii, July, 1868, pp. 347-359.

(207)

1868

CHESTER, G. J:  Transatlantic sketches, 1869, pp. 258-259.

(208)

1869

Reminiscences of America; by Two Englishmen, 1870, pp. 311-312.

(209)

1870?

TAYLOR, BAYARD.  Down the Eastern Shore.  Harper’s New Monthly Magazine, v. xliii, pp. 702-708.

1870?

CARPENTER, J. C.  Old Maryland: its homes and its people.  Appleton’s Journal, vol. xv, No. 363, March 4, 1876, pp. 289-292.

(210)

1871

KINGSLEY, C:, ed.  South by west, 1874, pp. 26-28.

1871

PALMER, J:W.  The City of monuments.  Lippincott’s Magazine, vol. viii, Sept., 1871, pp. 259-274.

1871

PALMER, J: W.  Baltimore beauty.  Lippincott’s Magazine, vol. viii, July, 1871, pp. 11-17.

(211)

1871

BRYANT, W: C., ed.  Picturesque America, 2 vols., 1872, v. 2, pp. 97-115.

(212)

1871-72?

YELVERTON, T.  Teresina in America, 2 vols., 1875, v. 2, pp. 147-151, 164-169.

(213)

1872

WATKINS, N. J., ed.  The pine and the palm greeting, 1873, pp. 40-43.

(214)

1873-74

KING, E:  The southern states of North America, 1875, pp. 733-770.

(215)

1874

BISHOP, N. H.  Voyage of the paper canoe, 1878, pp. 126-134.

(216)

1875?

WILSON, ROBERT.  On the Eastern Shore.  Lippincot’s Magazine, vol. xviii, pp. 73-80, 233-243, 362-371, 467-476.

1879

PYLE, HOWARD.  A Peninsular Canaan, Maryland (Eastern Shore).  Harper’s New Monthly Magazine, vol. lix, June, 1879, pp. 63-75.

1877

WILSON, ROBERT.  Wye Island.  Lippincott’s Magazine, vol. xix, April, 1877, pp. 466-474.

PALMER, J: W.  By the waters of Chesapeake. Century Magazine, vol. xxv, No. 2, Dec., 1893, pp. 252-270.

(217)

1875

GLAZIER, Capt. W.  Peculiarities of American cities, 1886, pp. 85-106.

Other guide books of this period are:

83

1876

Baltimore hand book of colleges, schools, libraries, museums, halls, etc.

1876

WEISHAMPEL, J. F., jr.  The stranger in Baltimore, 1876.

Guide to the City of Baltimore, 1869.

MAYER, BRANTZ.  Baltimore: past and present, 1871.

JONES, C: H.  Hand book of American travel, 1874.

The Patapsco Land Company of Baltimore City, 1874.  (Curtis Bay.)

Strangers’ hand guide to Baltimore City, 1874.

FOARD, N. E.  The stranger’s guide in Baltimore and its environs, 1876.

STRAHAN, E: (pseud.); LANIER, S.; POLLARD, E: A., and others.  Some highways and byways of American travel, 1878.

LLOYD, A. P., pub.  The Chesapeake illustrated, 1879.

DIDIER, E. L.  Maryland manners past and present.  The American, vol. iv, No. 95, June 3, 1882, p. 119.

PANGBORN, J. G.  Picturesque B. and O., 1883, pp. 37-68, 71-76, 85-96.

HOWARD, G: W.  The Monumental City, 1873.  (Other editions appeared, the last being published in 1889.)

McFARLANE, J.  An American geological railway guide, 1879, pp. 174-177.

(218)

1878

CAMPBELL, Sir G:  White and black in the U. S., 1879, pp. 251-259.

(219)

1879

SALA, G: A:  America revisited, 2 vols., 1882, v. 1, pp. 115-143.

(220)

1879

BODENSTEDT, FRIEDRICH.  Vom Atlantischen zum Stillen Ocean, 1882, p. 128.

(221)

1879?

STANGL, C.  Spaziergang nach Nordamerika, 1880, p. 283.

(222)

1880

ZSCHOKKE, HERMANN.  Nach Nordamerika und Canada, n. d., pp. 748-779.

(223)

1879-80

HARDY, Lady D.  Through cities and prairie lands, 1881, pp. 292-295.

(224)

MAYER, F.  Old Baltimore and its merchants. Harper’s New Monthly Magazine, vol. lx, No. 356, January, 1880, pp. 175-192.

1875

KING, E:  The Liverpool of America.  Scribner’s Monthly, vol. ix, April, 1875, pp. 681-695.

1880

SPENCER, EDWARD, ed.  One Hundred and Fiftieth Anniversary of the settlement of Baltimore, 1881.

1880

Baltimore, One Hundred and Fiftieth Anniversary of the settlement of.  Maryland Historical Society. Fund Publication No. 16.

84

(225)

1881

COOK, JOEL.  Brief summer rambles near Philadelphia, 1882, pp. 127-139.

(226)

1881

RUSSELL, W. H.  Hesperothen, 1882, v. 1, p. 69.

(227)

1881

SUTTER, A.  American notes, 1882, pp. 80, 84-85.

(228)

1882

HUDSON, T. S.  Scamper through America, 1882, pp. 63-65.

(229)

1882?

Baggage and boots; or, Smith’s first peep at America, 1883, pp. 133-138.
See also during this year, DIMER, E. L.  Social Athens of America.  Harper’s New Monthly Magazine, vol. lxv, No. 385, June, 1882, pp. 20-36.

VAN BIBBER, J.  Prospective advantages of Baltimore as a medical centre, 1882.

(230)

1883

HATTON, J.  Henry Irving’s impressions of America, 2 vols., 1884, v. 2, pp. 39-62.

(231)

1883-84

HESSE-WARTEGG, E. VON.  Nord Amerika, seine Städte und Naturwunder, 1884, B. 4, pp. 40-46.

(232)

1884

RAUM, G: E.  A tour around the world, 1886, p. 402.

(233)

1884?

ROTHROCK, J. T.  Vacation cruising in Chesapeake and Delaware Bays.

(234)

1889

BLAIKIE, W. G.  Summer suns in the far West, 1890, pp. 22-24.

1889-90?

See also Modern Odyssey; or, Ulysses up to date, 1891, pp. 48-50.

(235)

1890

O’RELL, MAX., ps. (P. Blouet).  Frenchman in America, 1891, pp. 339-340.

(236)

1890?

CRAIB, A.  America and the Americans, 1892, pp. 123-124, 137.

(237)

1891

WILLIAMS, G: H.  Geological excursions by university students across the Appalachians in May, 1891.  Johns Hopkins University Circulars, vol. xi, No. 94, 1891, pp. 25-27.  Baltimore to Point of Rocks via B. & O. R. R., Middletown Valley, Weverton; to Hancock and Round Top; to Cumberland, Will’s creek and Will’s mountain; to Lonaconing by the George’s Creek and Cumberland R. R.  Return to Mt. Savage via Frostburg along Jennings run to Cumberland.

1891

WILLIAMS, G: H., and CLARK, W: B.  Report on short excursions made by the geological department of the University during the autumn of 1891.  Johns Hopkins University Circulars, v. xi, No. 95, 1892, pp. 37-39.  Round Bay, Severn River, Anne Arundel County; Lorelei and Big Gunpowder, Baltimore County; Curtis Bay region, Anne Arundel County; Marriottsville, Howard County; Ft. Washington, Potomac River, Prince Georges County; Jones Falls from Baltimore to Washington; Linwood, Carroll County.

85

1893

WILLIAMS, G: H.  Sixth annual excursion of the geological department, 1893. Johns Hopkins University Circulars, v. xiii, No. 109, 1894, pp. 26-27.  Hagerstown; North Mountain; McCoy’s; Green Spring Furnace; Clear Spring; Edgar A. Small and the mastodon tooth; Hancock; Round Top.

1892

WILLIAMS, G: H., ed.  Guide to Baltimore, 1892.

Maryland Geological Survey Reports.  See especially Bibliography of the cartography of Md., by Edward B. Mathews, in vol. i, pp. 229-401.

(238)

1892

CLARETIE, L.  Feuilles de route aux Etats-Unis, n. d., pp. 57-58.

(239)

1894?

WILSON, C. D.  Land of the epicure.  The Cosmopolitan, v. xix, pp. 661-669.

(240)

1894

HOLE, S: R.  A little tour in America, 1895, pp. 328-332.

(241)

RIDGELY, H. W.  The old brick churches of Maryland, 1894.

(242)

1894

GUEST, THEODORA, Lady.  A round trip in North America, pp. 26-30.

(243)

1895

LUTAUD, A.  Aux Etats-Unis, 1896, pp. 144-149.

(244)

1896?

EDGEWORTH, J:  Maryland memories.  Chautauquan, v. xxv, pp. 16l-165.

(245)

1897?

WILSON, C. D.  The Eastern Shore.  Lippincott’s Monthly Magazine, vol. lxi, pp. 57-63.

LUCAS, J. CARRELL.  Eastern Shore of Maryland.  Dixie, vol. ii, July, 1899, pp. 87-94.

PRIEST, CHARLOTTE.  A Maryland Manor.  Dixie, vol. ii, Nov., 1899, pp. 523-528.

(246)

1899

Bump, C: W.  Down the historic Susquehanna.  From Otsego to the Chesapeake, 1899, pp. 164-184.

(247)

1900?

WILSON, RUFUS R.  Rambles in Colonial byways, 2 vols., 1901, pp. 9-41.

EDGEWORTH, J:  Maryland memories.  Chautauquan, vol. xxv, No. 2, May, 1897, pp. 161-165.

(248)

GLENN, T: A., ed.  Some Colonial mansions, 2 vols., 1898-1900, v. 1, pp. 23-136, 335-360; v. 2, pp. 343-375.

(249)

POWELL, L. P., ed.  Historic towns of the Southern States, 1900, pp. 1-45, 47-73, 75-99.

(250)

1903

STEINER, BERNARD C.  Traces of Claiborne’s settlement, Kent Island.  Johns Hopkins University Circulars, v. xxiii, No. 165, Dec., 1903.

(251)

1884?

SEARS, BALDWIN.  The circle in the square.  (Rockville, Mont. Co.)

1885?

BLANCHARD, AMY F.  Betty of Wye.

1870?

DOUGLAS, AMANDA M.  Osborne of Arrochar.

86

(252)

1843-1893

FREY, JACOB.  Reminiscences of Baltimore, 1893.

MAYER, FRANK B.  Maryland’s historical painter—Henry C. Hopkins, illustrated with seven reproductions from paintings.  Dixie, vol. ii, August, 1899, pp. 115-126.

Biographical cyclopedia of Maryland, etc., 1879.

BARRY, W: R. (1828-1900).  A memorial; by E. C. Wyand, 1904.

SCHLEY, ADMIRAL W. S. (1839-    ).  Forty-five years under the flag, 1904.

GIBBONS, JAMES, CARDINAL (1834-    ).  Collections in the life and times of; by John T. Reily, 7 v., 1890-1902.

(253)

FOARD, N. E.  Maryland as it is, 1903.

SCHARF, J: T:  The natural and industrial resources and advantages of Maryland, 1892.

MCDOWELL, E: G.  Here and there in Maryland. Dixie, vol. i, Feb., 1899, pp. 33-48.

United States Coast Pilot Atlantic Coast.  Pt. vi.  Chesapeake Bay and tributaries, 1902.

Baltimore (Deutschen Literarischen Bureau), 1887.

1895?

See also BONSAL, S.  The new Baltimore.  Harper’s New Monthly Magazine, vol. xcii, pp. 331-350.

PEIRSON, G. ALDEN.  Some picturesque bits of Baltimore. Dixie, vol. i, Jan., 1899, pp. 27-42.

DUGAN, M. C., comp.  Annapolis and the Naval Academy (1903?).

Handbook of the city of Annapolis, and the United States Naval Academy, 1888.

Illustrated Guide to Oakland (1900).

Book of the Royal Blue: Periodical published by the B. & O. R. R.  Contains a number of interesting articles on Maryland.

PAISLEY, W: D.  Cumberland, 1891.

Appleton’s general guide to the U. S. and Canada, 1892, pp. 46-54.

King’s handbook of the United States, 1891, pp. 321-338.

Appleton’s illustrated hand-book of American summer resorts, 1893, pp. 178, 187.

BAEDEKER, K:  The United States, with an excursion into Mexico, 1893, pp. 244-251, 265.

BAEDEKER, K:  The United States, with an excursion into Mexico, 1899, pp. 268-275, 291-292.  (Also 3d edition, 1904, pp. 301-309, 327-328.)

87

HOLLANDER, J. H.  Guide to the city of Baltimore, 1893.

(254)

WALTERS, W: THOMPSON.  Bushell, S. W.  Oriental collection of W. T. Walters, 1884.

WALTERS, W: THOMPSON.  Bushell, S. W.  Oriental ceramic art illustrated by examples from the collection of, 1897.

WALTERS, W: THOMPSON.  Gruelle, R: B.  Notes: critical and biographical collection of, 1895.

WALTERS, W. THOMPSON.  Prang, L.  Progressive proofs, collection of, 1895.

Walters collection; by W. Patterson.  American Magazine, v. viii, July, 1888, pp. 259-269.

Walters gallery, Baltimore; by A. J. F.  The American, vol. xviii, Aug., 1889, pp. 298-299.

Walters collection of Oriental porcelain; by Cosmo Monkhouse.  Magazine of Art, vol. xxiv, pp. 354-358.

Walters art collection at Baltimore; by Alfred Mathews.  Magazine of Western History, vol. x, May, 1889, pp. 1-16.

Walters art gallery; by M. Reizenstein.  New England Magazine, new series, vol. xii, July, 1895, pp. 545-560.

Walters collection of art treasures; by M. J. Lamb.  Magazine of American History, vol. xxvii, April, 1892, pp. 241-264.


INDEX

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Abdy, E. S., 88

Adams, John Quincy, 71

Alexander, Sir J. C., 80

Alsop, George, 9

Anburey, Thomas, 31

Arfwedson, C. D., 84

Asbury, Francis, 28

Ayllon, Lucas Vasquez de, 1

Baird, R., 115

Bayard, F. M., 38

Beltrami, J. C., 67

Bernard, John, 47

Bernhard, K., 73

Birkbeck, M., 59

Bishop, N. H., 215

Blaikie, W. G., 234

Boardman, James, 77

Bodenstedt, Frederick, 220

Bond, H. L., 158

Bowen, Ele, 122

Braddock, General, 25b

Bray, Rev. Thomas, 13

Buckingham, J. S., 96

Bump, C. W., 246

Bunn, A., 126

Burnaby, Andrew, 25

Butler, B. F., 142b

Campbell, Sir G., 218

Carew, Bamfylde-Moore, 16a

Carpenter, J. C., 211

Chalkley, Thomas, 11

Chambers, W., 123

Chateaubriand, F. A. R., 39

Chester, G. J., 207

Chevalier, Michael, 91

Claretie, L., 238

Clerk, Mrs. G., 205

Coke, E. T., 83

Coke, Thomas, 35, 45

Combe, G., 97

Cook, Ebenezer, 15

Cook, Joel, 225

Cooper, J. Fenimore, 69

Cooper, Thomas, 40

Cornwallis, K., 138

Cox, F. A., 92a

Craib, A., 236

Cunyinghame, A., 117

Darusmont, F. W., 66

Davies, E., 111

Davis, John, 49

Dickens, Charles, 104

Dixon, J., 113

Douglas, W., 21

Duden, Gottfried, 70

Dulany, Daniel, 24

Duncan, J. M., 61

Eddis, William, 27

Edgeworth, J., 244

Evans, Lewis, 20

Everest, R., 129

Faux, W., 63

Featherstonhaugh, G. W., 89

Ferguson, William, 130

Ferrall, S. A., 78

Finch, I., 86

Finch, M., 121

Garrettson, Freeborn, 29

Gilman, Caroline, 95

Gist, Christopher, 22

Glazier, Willard, 217

Gleig, G. R., 56

Glenn, T. A., 248

Gobright, J. C., 137

Godley, J. R., 105

Goodrich, C. A., 112

Gratton, T. C., 100

Grund, F. J., 93

Guest, Lady Theodora, 242

Gurney, J. J., 101

Hall, Basil, 74

Hall, F., 58

Hamilton, T., 79b

Hardy, Lady Duffus, 223

Harriott, J., 42

Hatton, J., 230

Hawkins, J. H. W., 57a

Hengiston, J. W., 120

Herman, Augustine, 8

Hesse-Wartegg, E. von, 231

Hicks, T. H., 142

Hoby, J., 92a

Hodgson, A., 64

Hole, S. R., 240

Holme, Benjamin, 17

Houston, Mrs. M. J., 107

Howe, General, 33

Howitt, E., 62

Hudson, T. S., 228

Jones, Hugh, 12

Jones, S. L., 144

Joynes, Thomas R., 53

Kalm, Peter, 19

Keith, Rev. George, 14

King, Edward, 204

Kingsley, Charles, 210

Lafayette, 71

Lanman, Charles, 110

La Rochefoucault-Liancourt, F. A. F., 46

Latham, H., 204

Latrobe, C. J., 85

Logan, J., 94

Lossing, Benson J., 114, 140

Lutand, A., 243

Lyell, Charles, 103

Mackay, Alexander, 109

Mackay, Charles, 135

Mackinnon, L. B., 118

Mandrillon, J., 33a

Martineau, Harriet, 92

Mason, Lowell, 54

Matheson, J., 90

Maxwell, A. M., 99

Mayer, Brantz, 131

Mayer, F., 224

Melish, John, 52

Müller, J. W. von, 132

Murray, H. A., 124

Olmsted, F. L., 125, 134

O’Rell, Max 235

Otterbein, Philip W., 26

Pairpoint, A., 133

Palmer, John, 60

Parkinson, R., 48

Popp, journal of, 32

Potter, H. M., 21a

Powell, L. P., 249

Power, Tyrone, 87

Priest, W., 41

Pulszky, F. and T., 119

Raum, J. E., 232

Reed, A., 90

Ridgely, Mrs. H. W., 241

Ripley, D., 50

Rogers, Robert, 25a

Rothrock, J. T., 233

Royall, Anne, 68, 75

Russell, W. H., 146, 226

Sala, G. A., 186, 219

Schnell, Leonard, 19a

Schoepf, John D., 36

Sharpe, Governor H., 23

Shaw, J., 127

Shrigley, Nathaniel, 9

Sioussat, G. L., 248

Smith, Sir Harry, 55

Smith, Captain John, 569

Smyth, J. F. D., 30

Sparks, Jared, 65

Stangl, C., 221

Strother, D. H., 136

Stuart, James, 76

Sturge, J., 102

Sutcliff, R., 51

Sutter, A., 227

Taylor, Bayard, 106, 209

Trollope, Anthony, 145

Trollope, Francis, 79

Tudor, H., 81

Twining, T., 43

Warville, J. P. B. de, 37

Washington, George, 18, 34

Watkins, N. J., 213

Waylen, E., 98

Weld, C. R., 128

Weld, Isaac, Jr., 44

Whitefield, George, 17a

Williams, G. H., 237

Williams, J. S., 57

Willis, N. P., 100a

Wills, W. H., 98a

Wilson, C. D., 245

Wilson, Robert, 216

Wilson, Rufus R., 247

Woods, N. A., 139

Wortley, Lady E. S., 116

Yelverton, T., 212

Zincke, F. B., 206

Zschokke, Hermann, 222